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Michala Petri, recorder
Anthony Newman, harpsichord
Telemann 4 2
Complete Recorder Sonatas
Enthusiastic review on "Telemann for Two" in Music Web International
Music Web International
01 January 2010
Containing six sonatas, four from Der Getreue Musikmeister and two from Essercizi Musici, this CD includes Telemann's most popular Sonata in F major and the virtuosic Sonata in C major. Michala Petri and Anthony Newman are an astonishingly accomplished and unparalleled duo whose directness and sense of oneness with the music translate lucidly. Having performed together in concert many times, it is surprising that this is their first joint recording. As such this is the much awaited release of the 'High Priest of the Harpsichord' and 'First Lady of the Recorder'.
 
Telemann stated that he 'always aimed at fidelity' because 'music ought not to be an effort'. Similarly, Petri and Newman interpret each piece with naturalness and ease. This is a work of the finest musicianship and collaboration which manifests itself in impeccable phrasing and a concordance of thematic ideas. Throughout each piece there is a sincerity and exacting disciple. Here are perfectionists at work and though not gaudily polished each piece is carefully executed. The sound quality is excellent and retains the character and voice of the recorder and harpsichord which complement each other so well.
 
The Triste from the Sonata in F minor demonstrates Petri's ability to wrench the recorder out of its staid tradition of being purely pastoral. This interpretation and impassioned performance alerts the listener to the melodious capabilities and depth of the recorder. No longer solely sweet, clear and pretty, the sound of the slow movements is timeless and penetrating.
 
The Sonata in C major is a flowery dalliance. Reflecting light at every turn, this piece glistens with charm and style galante. In a selection of letters dating from 1742, Telemann asks for flowers as he says he is: 'insatiable where hyacinths and tulips are concerned, greedy for ranunculi, and especially for anemones'. A bouquet of direct melodic charm, rhythmic clarity and economy of scale, Telemann exudes beauty and finesse. Here, Petri blends focus and intensity (Larghetto) with speedy gestures.
 
As a hoarder of styles from France and Italy, Telemann's assimilation of various forms is combined with the ability to mould them into something different such as a Germanic Grave in the Sonata in C major. These qualities render these compositions free from the shackles of tradition. This CD of works by an innovative composer contains the most expertly crafted and attentively scored music with a frantic spark of imagination running through each piece. His associated range and sense of possibility would have an influence on J. S. Bach, who would then overshadow Telemann with his knotty contrapuntal scores. This CD firmly reinstates Telemann as not only a composer who was famed for his ability to 'write a motet for eight voices more quickly than one could write a letter', as Handel quipped, but as a composer who can voice agitation (Sonata in D minor) and delight (Sonata in B flat major). Accordingly, Petri's modulations from breathy exhales to crisp trills and Newman's ability to dart and dwell in the music, express the full range of Telemann's emotions. 

Lucy Jeffery , March 13th 2014
Music Web International

Michala Petri, recorder
Lan Shui, conductor
Chinese Recorder Concertos
East Meets West
Great review in US Music Magazine All Music on Chinese Recorder Concertos
All Music Guide
01 January 2010
East Meets West: Chinese Recorder Concertos
Review in All Music
by James Manheim, Nov/Dec 2010
The contents of this album are less unusual than the proclaimed Chinese recorder concertos concept. Only one of the four works, Chen Yi's The Ancient Chinese Beauty, is originally written for recorders; the others are arranged from music for Chinese flutes (or, in the case of Bright Sheng's Flute Moon, Western piccolo). Sheng and Chen Yi are partly Western-trained, and their pieces arose in an American context. This said, veteran recorder virtuosa Michala Petri, recording in her home country of Denmark with the Copenhagen Philharmonic under Chinese-Singaporean conductor Lan Shui, delivers a bravura performance here. Chen Yi writes difficult registral jumps for Petri, but elsewhere, as in the low oscillations of the finale of Tang Jianping's Fei Ge (Flying Song), one gets the feeling that Petri has pushed the recorder into new tonguings as she imitates the Chinese dizi bamboo flute. The presence of the Tang Jianping work points to another of the album's strengths: its diverse program. There is a work in the Chinese style familiar to listeners of the Mao Zedong era; Bang di concerto composer Ma Shui-Long is Taiwanese, but as the excellent booklet notes (in English and Chinese, but not Danish) indicate, the official Taiwanese style of that time, intended to provide a counterweight to the Yellow River Concerto being promoted by the mainland government, ended up being similar to it in many ways, because official styles are official styles. This concerto, originally written for the bang di small membrane flute, marked the beginnings of his move away from this style. The biggest find is the Tang Jianping piece, an eventful, kaleidoscopic piece drawing on a variety of Chinese folk traditions and expertly handling the Western orchestra (it was originally composed for a Chinese ensemble but arranged by the composer). The program is truly a "Chinese fugue in four voices," as the booklet proclaims, and mention should be made of the unusually elaborate and nicely edited booklet, complete with Chinese seals. A strong outing from Denmark's new OUR Recordings label, and it is to be hoped that the label will enter the field of cross-cultural repertory that has so far been left mostly to the Netherlands label Channel Classics.

All Music Guide

Michala Petri, recorder
Lan Shui, conductor
Chinese Recorder Concertos
East Meets West
Amazing review in American Record Guide (ARG)on Chinese Recorder Concertos
American Record Guide
01 January 2010
American Record Guide. February 2011

Chinese Recorder Concertos
TANG: Fei Ge; SHENG: Flute Moon; MA: Bamboo
Flute Concerto; CHEN: The Ancient Chinese Beauty
Michala Petri;Copenhagen Philharmonicl Lan Shui

OUR 6220603
71 minutes

Tang Jianping (b 1955), Sheng Bright (b 1955), Ma Shui-long (b 1939), and Chen Yi (b 1953) will be new to some readers; others will know they want this music right away. Here we have today's foremost recorder soloist in four major contemporary pieces, with a very capable Chinese-born conductor at the helm.

Two of these composers, Sheng and Chen, have settled in the United States, while Tang has prospered in China and Ma in Taiwan. Their careers were inevitably colored by politics. In the 1960s and 70s, mainland China and Taiwan experienced cultural revolutions that purged intellectuals and Western culture. The arts were thence to express not the ideas of free individuals, but the ideology of the state. When universities reopened in 1978, Tang, Chen, and Sheng were among the first classes to be admitted at conservatories in Shenyang, Beijing, and Shanghai. Ma, somewhat older than the rest, studied music theory and composition at the National Taiwan Academy of the Arts from 1959 to 1964 and then pursued additional studies in West Germany.

This music speaks for itself. It is difficult to believe that these Oriental panoramas were
recorded in Copenhagen. Tang's piece ranks with the most interesting music I have ever heard. His concerto communicates with all the clarity of American film music, but none of the cheapness. Part III has the energy of perky Bernstein or perhaps music from The Simpsons-pure energy, but genuine quality, and a big, big ending. Sheng's Flute Moon consists of 'Chi Lin's Dance' and 'Flute Moon'. 'Chi Lin's Dance' is a somewhat aggressive march with lots of timpani followed by a movement twice its length and much quieter. Ma's Bamboo Flute Concerto opens with a measured tread that sounds German; but soon we encounter piping, and the tempo takes off in a more Chinese-sounding style. There is a fascinating cadenza in the first movement, and Petri also gets a workout in the Finale. Ma's is the only work to use traditional Italian movement titles. Chen uses the most extended sound palette of the four composers, and her piece has the most difficult solo part. In its orientation toward sound, this writing is more like Crumb and Gubaidulina. The piece seems to invite choreography. For that matter, dance companies could well consider presenting any of these works.

The performances are laden with vitality and splendor. Everyone seems to be giving 110%. The impression this creates is due in part to extraordinary sound. Louds are very loud on this recording, and a passage in the Sheng is barely audible. As for Petri's playing, pick the superlatives of your choice; they should all apply. The recorder is not a loud instrument, but I can only imagine Petri commanding the stage as she plays it. To judge by the results presented here, conductor Lan Shui is excellent. He studied at the Shanghai Conservatory (composition) and Beijing Central Conservatory (conducting) before gaining further experience in the United States. He has been chief conductor of the Copenhagen Philharmonic since 2007 and has 16 CDs to his credit.
There are 19 pages of English notes and 9 in Chinese. This music speaks a language that communicates like little else I have heard lately. - GORMAN

Enjoy.

j.
American Record Guide

Michala Petri and Lars Hannibal
Café Vienna
19th Century Café Music
Review on Cafe Vienna in Musikeren
Musikeren
23 November 2009
Musikeren

Michala Petri, recorder
Anthony Newman, harpsichord
Telemann 4 2
Complete Recorder Sonatas
Great review on Telemann for TWO in The Classical Reviewer
The Classical Reviewer
16 November 2009
The Classical reviewer:Sunday, 2 March 2014
Michala Petri and Anthony Newman bring us hugely attractive sonatas for recorder and basso continuo by Telemann on a new release from OUR Recordings
Michala Petri www.michalapetri.com began playing the recorder at the age of three and could be heard for the first time on Danish radio by the age of five.  She made her debut as a concert soloist in 1969 at the Tivoli Concert Hall and, since then, the Danish artist has toured all the continents, and has appeared in the most famous concert halls in the world and many festivals.
Her repertoire ranges from baroque to the contemporary with many composers writing works for her. In the concert hall and on record, Michala Petri has worked with artists such as Heinz Holliger, James Galway, Gidon Kremer, Pinchas Zukerman, Claudio Abbado, Christopher Hogwood or Keith Jarrett; while ensembles such as the English Chamber Orchestra, the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields, the Swedish Chamber Orchestra, the Moscow Virtuosi, the Berlin Baroque Soloists or Kremerata Baltica have been her partners on stage or in the studio. Since 1992, Michala Petri has played with the guitarist and lutenist Lars Hannibal and has performed with him all over the world.

Over the years Michala Petri has received many honours and awards, including the German Echo Disc Award, the Léonie Sonning Music Prize, the Wilhelm Hansen Music Prize and the H.C. Lumbye Prize for her achievement in bringing classical music to a wide audience.    Michala Petri is Vice President of the Danish Society for Fighting Cancer and a board member of UNICEF Denmark.

Michala Petri's latest recording for OUR Recordings www.ourrecordings.com features Telemann's Sonatas for Recorder and Basso continuo with Petri joined by harpsichordist Anthony Newman www.anthonynewmanmusician.org

Of the six sonatas on this disc, the first four are from Der Getreue Musik-Meaister (The Faithful Music Master), a musical periodical (1728-29) jointly founded by Telemann featuring short compositions and lessons in the rudiments of musical theory. These are hugely attractive sonatas with some memorable tunes, especially as played by these two fine artists. The Vivace of Sonata in F major from this set is a gloriously lively piece with Michala Petri providing some lovely mellow recorder sounds, nicely balanced with the harpsichord continuo of Anthony Newman. Petri draws some lovely, fluent lines in the Largo with wonderfully expressive harpsichord accompaniment before a lively dancing Allegro with lovely sprung rhythms.

The Sonata in B flat major opens with a rather stately Largo and some terrific chords from the harpsichord with some lovely agile playing from Petri. The vibrant Allegro, where Telemann gives us such a stream of invention, receives some brilliant staccato playing from Petri before the Largo, full of affectingly melancholy sounds from Petri's recorder. The concluding Vivace is full of infectious playing from these two artists.

The solemn Triste that opens the Sonata in F minor is given a richly conceived performance, full of broad harpsichord chords around which the recorder weaves its theme. The opening of the Allegro has a steady pace but soon becomes vibrant with some really fine playing from both artists. The Vivace is truly a performance of virtuosity with Petri showing her incredible skills of fluency and agility. This is terrific playing.

In the Sonata in C major there is a beautifully paced Cantabile that has a particularly memorable tune and an Allegro that receives more formidable playing from Petri and Newman, with these two players seemingly knowing each other's thoughts. There is incredible agility of playing from Petri. The Grave brings more of Telemann's broad sonorous harpsichord chords as Petri weaves her recorder melody above. The Vivace is full of invention, receiving a terrific performance.

After the four sonatas from Der Getreue Musik-Meaister come two sonatas from Esserzicii Musici (Musician's Exercises), a misleading title as these pieces were apparently not intended as studies.

The first performed here is the Sonata in D minor with an Affettuoso that has a beguiling theme. The Presto shoots ahead with these two artists showing terrific ensemble and with more intricate playing from Petri in this quite intoxicating movement. As Newman 'strums' chords on his harpsichord in the third movement, Grave, Petri delivers a lovely flowing theme in this short link to the Allegro, another complete delight with simply stunning playing from Petri and Newman providing so much more than any mere accompaniment.

Finally we have the Sonata in C major with an opening movement marked Adagio that, nevertheless, has some spirited faster sections where Telemann gives us another fine tune, beautifully played. The lovely Larghetto has the recorder and harpsichord weaving the theme between them before the lively Vivace, full of terrific playing right up to the end.

These are terrific performances that receive a fine recording within a nice acoustic as well as excellent booklet notes. This release has a slightly shorter duration than most discs but given the quality of the performances and its on-line price, it is thoroughly recommendable. Bruce and Deborah Reader

The Classical Reviewer

Michala Petri, recorder
Danish National Symphony Orchestra
Movements
Sequenza21 Review on Movements
Sequenza 21
14 November 2009
Movements features three pieces that place perhaps the most humble of instruments, the recorder, in the least humble of settings, the concerto. While the idea of a recorder concerto probably conjures up images antithetical to new music, Michala Petri, the featured soloist on this disc, is out to dispel those associations. To that end, Petri commissioned three contemporary composers and gave us a disc that features compositions for her instrument all written within the 21st century.

The first of these is Joan Albert Amargós' Northern Concerto. Amargós' bio references jazz and flamenco traditions along with the classical, and melodic influences from those worlds pop up throughout the concerto. I can't say that the appearances of these influences always blend cohesively, but owing to the strength of the melodies, I didn't mind too much. It's an undeniably drinkable piece that takes some chances pitting the recorder against the full orchestra and largely succeeds. In fact, Petri's recording earned the piece a Grammy nomination.

Daniel Börtz's one-movement concerto, Pipes and Bells, takes a completely different tack, focusing on the recorder's distinctive timbre. Particularly nice is his opening pairing of the recorder and the bass clarinet with some brass stabs thrown in for contrast. At various places in the work the titular bells ring, again offering spectral contrast with the simple profile of the recorder's pipe. Börtz also consistently gives the recorder plenty of space. The orchestra mostly provides a textural bath, occasionally churning itself into a crashing wave.

The final concerto is Steven Stucky's Etudes. Like most good works of that title, the piece avoids sounding like any sort of study. The three movements promise scales, glides, and arpeggios respectively. Those techniques are certainly delivered, but unobtrusively and always musically. Indeed, it's here that the recorder sounds most at home with the rest of the orchestra.

With these three clever commissions, Petri offers a convincing argument that the recorder can achieve a place outside of its historical niche. Not once on the disc do Petri and her instrument sound out of place despite the new music context and the potency of the full orchestra. In fact, I'd imagine that these concertos would work quite well on any orchestra's program.

Lanier Sammons

To read this review online and post comments, click here.
Sequenza 21

Michala Petri, recorder
Carolin Widmann, violin
Mozart Flute Quartets
Reveiw Gramophone China on Mozart
Gramophone Magazine
14 November 2009
MOZART Four Flute Quartets
Recorder    Michala Petri
Violin          Caroline Widmann
Viola          Ula Ulijona
Cello            Marta Sadraba

OUR Recordings [F] 6.220570 (59'. DDD)

Version compared to:
Galway Tokyo Quartet  (BMG) 74321-80015-2

The recorder player provided more possibilities in the Adagio.

Whether to pick Mozart Flute Quartet in Galway's modern flute version or Michala Petri's authentic and pure performance is quite a difficult choice for the audience – the former version has been known for a while but the latter has more unique tunes.

Mozart composed these quartets during the time when recorders were historically being replaced by flutes. The recorder, invented as early as the guitar, gradually disappeared from the music scene and was replaced by the "grandfather" of modern flutes: the transverse flute. No doubt that at least two (D major quartet, K.285 and A major quartet, K.298) of the several pieces in the release were composed for transverse flutes. After all, the composer noticed chamber music's newest member. But there is no way to be sure of the composer's original choice of instruments.  It would be difficult to determine their difference if it was not Galway's distinctive mouthpiece control techniques.

Then what was the intention of the composer? Transverse flutes are absolutely better in tuning balance but the recorder is especially outstanding for the emotional responses emphasized by the special singing-like feature – the G major quartet (K.285) first movement in Adagio seems more touching.

Even in the comparatively faster parts, recordist Michala Petri keeps the sound clear and clean, even with Galway's advantages. To determine which instrument Mozart was thinking of when he composed these pieces by judging the music or by reading the score is still too difficult a job.

We should appreciate recorder players for providing us with this option. In fact, to most listeners, it's not important at all to determine which instrument Mozart chose when he composed these flute quartets. Recorder or transverse flute? Even if it was transverse flute, we still cannot restore the real tune by the adapted Boehm System. Therefore, Historically Informed Performance Practice can only help us to approach the cultural background and music appreciation of the olden days; nowadays, the orchestra configuration is fixed and the music appreciation is formed, techniques are more "modern" – one wonders if the proficient Mozart would be willing to compose contemporary music in a more aggressive way?

       
Gramophone Magazine

Gert Mortensen
Axel Borup-Jørgensen (1924-2012)
The Percussion Universe of Axel Borup-Jørgensen
Full House (10/10/10) review in Klassik Heute on "The Percussion Universe of Axel Borup-Jørgensn"
Klassik Heute Magazine
14 November 2009
Klassik Heute, Germany
Das innovative dänische Label OUR Recordings hat sich in den vergangenen Jahren immer wieder um die Musik der Gegenwart verdient gemacht. Ein ganz besonderes Projekt, das sich der Musik des großen dänischen Komponisten Axel Borup-Jørgensen (1924-2012) widmet,ist für OUR Recordings ganz offensichtlich eine wirkliche Herzensangelegenheit.Axel Borup-Jørgensen war so etwas wie die „stille Eminenz", der „Grand Old Man" der dänischen Moderne. Er zählte 1959 zu den ersten dänischen Komponisten, die die Darmstädter Ferienkurse für Neue Musik besuchten. Die Begegnung mit dieser neuen Klangwelt hat tiefe Spuren in seinem Schaffen hinterlassen, jedoch komponierte er nie streng seriell, sondern ließ sich in seiner kompositorischen Arbeit stets von Intuition und seinem außerordentlichen Klangsinn leiten. Seine Musik kennt feinste melodische Verästelungen ebenso wie zupackende, dramatische Eruptionen, so etwa in seinem orchestralen Hauptwerk Marin (1970) oder der Musica autumnalis aus dem Jahr 1977.
Eine Serie von (in jeder Hinsicht) exemplarischen Einspielungen seiner Werke fand mit einer Auswahl von Borup-Jørgensens Blockflötenmusik im Frühjahr dieses Jahres ihren Auftakt.Die nun vorliegende zweite CD widmet sich dem (so der Titel) „Schlagzeug-Universum" des Komponisten. Der Begriff „Universum" ist tatsächlich nicht zu hoch gegriffen. Borup-Jørgensen hat in Jahren stiller Arbeit seine ureigene Klangwelt erschaffen und unbeirrbar konsequent zu einer eigenständigen, keiner Mode des 20. Jahrhunderts nachhechelnden Musiksprache gefunden. Nichts könnte dies besser demonstrieren als seine ur-idiomatische und facettenreiche Schlagzeugmusik: herb, von starker Geste, kantig auch zuweilen, andererseits aber auch zart und sinnlich.
Mit Gert Mortensen hat dazu man einen der weltweit führenden Perkussionisten gewinnen
können, aber man täte den anderen Interpeten der CD unrecht, ließe man sie unerwähnt: die weltbekannte Blockflötenvirtuosin Michala Petri ist ebenso zu hören wie der geniale
Bratscher Tim Frederiksen, das Blechbläserquintett des Dänischen Nationalorchesters, die
chinesische Schlagzeugerin Qiao Jia Jia und das Percurama Percussion Ensemble. Ohne
Übertreibung: Musiker von Weltrang.Aufgrund der vielfältigen Klangkombinationen wirkt die zweite Folge der Borup-Jørgensen-Edition dramaturgisch noch schlüssiger und überzeugender als die erste. Das schon für sich allein außerordentlich reich besetzte Schlagwerk wird in den verschiedenen Stücken von Solo-Viola, Blockflöte, Ensemble, einem zweiten Schlagzeugapparat und Blechbläserquintett ergänzt.
In Solo op. 88 aus dem Jahr 1979 begegnet uns eine breite Palette an
Perkussionsinstrumenten, u.a. diverse Gongs, Becken, Trommeln, Marimba- und Vibraphon, Zymbeln und gestimmte Flaschen. Dies alles gleichzeitig zu bedienen und zu koordinieren, ist schon für sich allein eine Meisterleistung. Mortensen zelebriert dieses Werk geradezu mit großem Ernst und unbedingter Leidenschaft.
Die Musik für Schlagzeug und Viola op. 18, ein frühes Werk des Komponisten, entstand
bereits Mitte der Fünfziger Jahre, noch vor Borup-Jørgensens Darmstadt-Aufenthalt. Im
Vergleich zu späteren Werken wirkt die Klangsprache hier noch linearer, motorischer und
weniger fragmentarisch, Musik von außerordentlicher Expressivität und zuweilen elegischem Duktus. Der fabelhafte Bratscher Tim Frederiksen verleiht dem Werk mit herrlich sonorem Ton besonderen Ausdruck.
In La Primavera op. 97 für Schlagzeug-Duo setzt sich in gewisser Weise die Klangwelt des
Solos fort und erweitert sie durch andere Farbakzente: geheimnisvoll-düstere Gong- und
Beckenschläge, silbrig-zarte Crotales und kraftvoll-energetische Trommel- bzw. Tom-Tom-
Passagen entladen sich schlussendlich in großflächigen, ekstatischen Klangflächen. Gert
Mortensen und Qiao Jia Jia ergänzen hier einander perfekt.
Borup-Jørgensens Duo für Blockflöte und Schlagzeug Periphrasis ist bereits auf der ersten
CD enthalten, wurde aber eigens für die zweite Folge noch einmal neu produziert. Die Mühe hat sich gelohnt: vieles wirkt nochmals verfeinert in der Interaktion, sinnlicher.
Winter Music für Schlagzeug und Blechbläserquintett zählt zu den faszinierendsten Stücken der CD: eine Musik der gedeckten Farben (die Blechbläser spielen meist sordiniert), sich verzahnender Signal-Motive, die eine fast surrealistische Atmosphäre schafft.
Ich möchte diese Aufnahme wärmstens empfehlen. Es lohnt sich, in das eigentümliche Klang-Universum Borup-Jørgensens einzutauchen, das mit jedem erneuten Hören neue Geheimnisse preiszugeben scheint. Eine in jeder Hinsicht phänomenale Produktion, eine CD der Superlative, die an musikalischer wie klangtechnischer Perfektion kaum noch zu überbieten sein dürfte. Darüber hinaus bietet das graphisch und inhaltlich sorgfältigst edierte Beiheft in englischer Sprache eine Fülle von nützlichen Informationen zum Komponisten, den Werken und Interpreten. Man kann also mit Spannung einer Fortsetzung dieses verdienstvollen Projekts entgegensehen.
Heinz Braun
(30.09.2014)
Wertung: 10 / 10 /10
Klassik Heute Magazine

Michala Petri and Lars Hannibal
Café Vienna
19th Century Café Music
Review on Cafe Vienna in Gramophone!
Gramophone Magazine
14 November 2009
Attractive melody abounds on this charming and amiable disc!

In the booklet accompanying this delightful disc, Joshua Cheek ends his brief notes on the origins of the Viennese coffee culture by telling us that the recorder and guitar have formed an imaginary "house band" in order to recreate the experience of enjoying a leisurely Sunday afternoon Kaffeeklatsch in Vienna circa 1800. And indeed the programme is as light and frothy as the cream on a Vienna coffee - though with fewer calories. Mauro Giuliani's "Gran Duetto Concertante" was orriginally written for flute or violin and guitar, and is typical of that composers's penchant for attractive melody and idiomatic arpeggio
figures; fellow Italian guitarist Fernando Carulli's set of variatios on a tune familiar to all makes similarity few demands on the listener.
These are followed by another set of variations; this time by composer who was as prolific as he is obscure, one Joseph Küffner, two Beethoven sonatinas without opus number, originally written for mandolin and piano, and three more variations on the variation theme, originally tor the now-obsolete alto recorder-like csakan, by the accomplished multi-instrumentalist, Ernest Krähmer. Joseph Mayseder, virtuoso violinist and intimate of Beethoven, and Carl Scheindienst.
The latter three works are the more overtly virtuoso; but it's to the credit of the considerable musicianship of this amiable duo, who even the most tired compositional device commands attention. This is lightweight fare, to be sure, but Petri and Hannibal don't pretend otherwise, and as a result a good time is had by all. More sugar please?
William Yeoman, April 2010
Gramophone Magazine

Michala Petri, recorder
Carolin Widmann, violin
Mozart Flute Quartets
New review on Mozart in Gramophone
Gramophone Magazine
10 November 2009
The nimble Petri makes the recorder sound
so right in Mozart – delightful!"
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart:
The Flute Quartets (complete)
Quartet in D major, K.285
1. Allegro
2. Adagio
3. Rondeau: Allegretto
Quartet in G major, K.285a
4. Andante
5. Tempo di Menuetto
Quartet In C Major, K.285b
6. Allegro
7. Tema con variazioni
Quartet in A Major, K.298
8. Tema con variazioni
9. Menuetto
10. Rondieoux: Allegretto grazioso, ma non troppo
Michala Petri, Recorder*
Carolin Widmann, Violin ● Ula Ulijona, Viola ● Marta Sudraba, Cello
Catalogue Number: OUR Recordings 6.220570 (SACD)
Mozart's Flute Quartets played on recorders? Unusual but not improbable; and Michala Petri, who uses recorders in three different pitches, is likely to disarm resistance or hostility. She chooses a sopranino instrument for K298. But no shrill piping, no phlegmatic phrasing. The first movement is a theme and four variations, the overall marking Andantino implying a single tempo. But as Mozart offers each musician an individual role in each of the four variations, Petri treats the components as separate facets of a single entity. She relaxes or tightens the pace as necessary without compromising unity; and no one hogs the limelight. These artists know when to blend, separate or step forward without upstaging one another. The return to the theme at the end, not in the score and therefore "unauthorized" is, nevertheless, a thoughtful interpretative touch.
The sound on this disc (in SACD) is alluringly recorded - call the shots. Nalen Anthoni
Gramophone Magazine

Michala Petri, recorder
Anthony Newman, harpsichord
Telemann 4 2
Complete Recorder Sonatas
The Recorder Magazine on Telemann for Two
The Recorder Magazine
08 November 2009
Michala Petri (recorder) and Anthony Newman's (harpsichord) new recording of Georg PhilippTeleman's (1681-1767)complete recorder sonatas is a welcome challenge to Handel's recorder sonatas. When
considering Telemann's profilic output it seems surprising that he only has six surviving recorder sonatas, especially as he was a talented recorder player. However, quality makes up for quantity as Telemann is a superb composer. Perhaps out of all the sonatas the Sonata in F Minor seems to be the most provocative and powerful, certainly in the first movement, "Triste", is very magically hypnotic and haunting. Petri manages to successfully communicate the emotional intensity and passion, supported brilliantly by Newman's accompaniment. This is followed by a fiery "Allegro". And the a beautiful emotional "Andante". This sonata then concludes with an excitingly virtuoso "Vivace" with fast and slick ornamentation from Petri enveloped around Newman's tight yet expressive continuo playing.
Overall this is a wonderfully entertaining new recording that displays the mastery of Telemann portrayed skilfully and virtuosically by Petri and Newman. Oliver Smith, The Recorder Magazine,- March 2014
The Recorder Magazine

Michala Petri, recorder
Carolin Widmann, violin
Mozart Flute Quartets
Musical Pointer Review on Mozart Flute Quartets
Musical Pointer Magazine
11 October 2009
MOZART: The Four Flute Quartets
Michala Petri, recorders/ Carolin Widmann, violin/ Ula Ulijona, viola/ Marta Sudraba, cello
OUR Recordings SACD 6.220570
Not Mozart's favourite instrument nor are these my favourite Mozart works - they are given loving performances which make convincing the use of recorders, rather than the more usual modern flute in many of the recordings available.
Michala Petri rings the changes with several instruments and finishes K285b on sopranino, which I doubt she would claim as in any way authentic, but no matter, it makes for an effective finish.
I have a personal interest in this release because, in long since student days when I used to play the recorder, I deplored the lack of any Mozart solo music for my instrument. So I transcribed the (inauthentic) solo part of the "violin sonata K.570" [Peters Edn] to create a Mozart sonata for treble recorder, which was belatedly published by Peacock Press in time for the Mozart 250 celebrations year; it is available from Recorder Music Mail. **
The disc is a high quality SACD recording (if you have the equipment to appreciate its niceities*) but the music sounds fine on a variety of ordinary players. It should inspire recorder players to bring the quartets into their chamber music repertoires.

Peter Grahame Woolf
Musical Pointer Magazine

Michala Petri, recorder
Chen Yue, xiao and dizi
Dialogue - East Meets West
Review in German Magazine for Chambermusic "Ensemble" on Dialogue-East meets West.
Ensemble
11 October 2009
5 out of 5 Stars!
Michala Petri, the quintessence of the Recorder Art have been fasinated by the Far-East sound and have searched the interplay with the foreign music culture.
In the Chinese Chen Yue she found a competent collegue on the fraditional flutes from her country.
This CD, the second of a Dialogue series from the Label is a sounding experience in searching and finding! Together they play 10 works, five Chinese and 5 Danish. The mix of elements from both cultures make an exciting reflexion of many colours of sounds, that  flows into each other, with each other and against each other in known and foreign tonality, looking, describing, reconciling. invocating, encouraging. Like in a description a thousand years old Chinese painting af the nature these intimate abstract full coloured sound pictures create a visuality that let us stay in a dream that we can be redeemed in this complex world! Admireable what the Danish friend Michala Petris imagination and intuition with her composition in such a idealistic can persuade.
Dieter Steppuhn
Ensemble

Michala Petri, recorder
Anthony Newman, harpsichord
Telemann 4 2
Complete Recorder Sonatas
Great review in German Magazine Fono Forum on Telemann for Two
Fono Forum
01 August 2009
Fono Forum Review on Telemann for Two
The passionate plea that appears in the opening paragraph of the booklet makes the case that the works of Telemann still require a justification and defense. And it is true, that for a long time the master was considered "merely" a prolific and the quality of his creations was often at best, mediocre. Meanwhile, as we have come to know parts of his oeuvre better, it is fair to say that while sometimes, for purely mercantile reasons he succeeded too well in accommodating the tastes of his customers, at others, he surpassed all of his peers with his ability to write with mastery in a variety of styles.
As for the recorder sonatas from the "Getreuen Music-Meister" and/or "Essercizii Musici", while written for the marketplace, are certainly more representative of the latter category. Not only are the different national styles presented here in a perfect form, but also the range between the plain and the ornate, between simplicity and brilliance are explored. There's something for everyone, without any chance that boredom might arise. And it is certainly the case that Michala Petri and Anthony Newman their have taken their share; both approach these works with a straightforward and above all, a completely unaffected playing.
Although Michala Petri can show every now and then just how many notes-per-second can come from a piece of wood, it is never passed off as an end in itself. Newman remains acoustically a little in the background, providing the recorder with an amazingly soft sounding foundation. After listening to this enjoyable "Popular Music", I find myself, no doubt like many, who wish that Telemann had been an even more prolific writer and had presented us with more pieces like these. - Reinmar Emans, February 2014
Fono Forum

Michala Petri, recorder
Chen Yue, xiao and dizi
Dialogue - East Meets West
Fanfare Magazine review on Dialogue-East meets West
Fanfare Magazine
26 July 2009
Michala Petri: DIALOGUE—EAST MEETS WEST on OUR RECORDINGS       
Classical Reviews - Ensemble 
Written by James Reel   
Friday, 19 June 2009 


DIALOGUE—EAST MEETS WEST • Michala Petri (rec); Chen Yue (xiao, dizi) • OUR RECORDINGS 6.220600 (Hybrid multichannel SACD: 67: 46)

YAO HU Rong (Fusion). M. NIELSEN Stream. RUI LI Peng Zhuang (Sparkling-Collision). SEJLUND Butterfly-Rain. GANG CHEN The Greeting from Afar. MONRAD EastWest-project 16. SIQIN CHAOKETU Yan Gui (The wild goose comes back home). ROFELT Circonflexe. RUOMEI CHEN Jue (Very rare and fine jade). MURASHKIN Cascades


Buy now from AmazonContemporary Chinese pieces alternate with works by young Danes on this recording that teams the European recorder family with its Chinese analogs, the xiao and dizi. All of these pieces were written, mostly by composers under 30, in 2007 especially for this project spearheaded by the two performers. Most of the Chinese pieces sound distinctly Chinese, through the composers' choice of scales and use of note-bending and other Asian playing techniques. A couple of them quote Chinese melodies, but none of this is travelogue music. Peng Zhuang , for instance, sounds like an extract from Orff's Schulwerk . The Danish pieces, I suppose, are also typical of their culture, yet the greatest interest here is not hearing who uses a pentatonic scale and who does not, but how the various composers cause the two wind instruments to interact. Rong , for example, has Michala Petri and Chen Yue engage in independent but parallel play, whereas Stream establishes a closer, more interdependent relationship between the two lines. The Greeting from Afar by Gang Chen (not the composer by the same name responsible for the "Butterfly Lovers" Violin Concerto) is a playful piece calling for the highest instruments from the dizi and recorder families, while Circonflexe requires the players to switch among the full range of their instruments. Some of the pieces, like Cascades , are lovely, rippling, and fluid, while others are a bit more thorny. This is certainly not New Age meditation music, but neither is it strenuously avant-garde. Both artists play superbly, and the audio quality is notable for what it lacks—there's no high-frequency distortion, no extraneous noise, no strange coloration, nothing but the natural sounds of the instruments recorded in the flattering acoustics of a Danish church. James Reel



Fanfare Magazine

Michala Petri, recorder
Chen Yue, xiao and dizi
Dialogue - East Meets West
A 10/10/10 review on Dialogue in Klassik Heute
Klassik Heute Magazine
22 July 2009
Details (20.07.2009)

China ist in – und dies nicht erst seit den Olympischen Sommerspielen im vergangenen Jahr. Das Interesse am Reich der Mitte, an dessen Sprache und Kultur ist in den letzten Jahrzehnten stetig gewachsen. Allein ein flüchtiger Blick genügt, um sich von der vermeintlichen Überlegenheit des Abendlandes zu verabschieden und sich in staunender Demut zu üben: so reich, so übervoll von Schönheiten ist die Kultur Chinas, und das wenige, das wir davon hier im Westen bislang überhaupt kennengelernt und wahrgenommen haben, erweist sich als die Spitze eines Eisbergs, dessen Größe und Bedeutung sich erst nach und nach erschließt.

Einer der schönsten und vielleicht auch tiefgreifendsten Wege, in eine fremde Kultur einzutauchen, ist der künstlerische Austausch, die aktive kreative Auseinandersetzung mit dem Andersartigen und zugleich die Erkenntnis, wie viel Gemeinsames es zu entdecken gibt.

Die dänische Blockflötistin Michala Petri hat sich zusammen mit ihrer chinesischen Partnerin Chen Yue auf eine faszinierende musikalische Reise begeben. Ihr Projekt „Dialogue – East meets West" stellt Duette für (westliche) Blockflöte und (chinesische) Querflöte einander gegenüber, die 2007 von je fünf chinesischen und dänischen Komponisten eigens für diese CD konzipiert wurden.

Ich war auf das Resultat mehr als gespannt: Chinesische Folklore versus westliche Avantgarde? Pentatonik gegen Dodekaphonie? Hedonistischer Schönklang im Kontrast zu modernen Spieltechniken? Es würde den Rahmen sprengen, auf alle zehn eingespielten Werke näher einzugehen. Soviel sei gesagt: Alle zehn Stücke sind überaus hörenswert und bieten ein breites Spektrum von ästhetischen, stilistischen und formalen Ansätzen. Alle Konzepte überzeugen, spielen sie auf traditionelle Volksmusik Chinas bzw. der Inneren Mongolei an (Li Rui, Gang Chen, Siqin Chaoketu), verbinden sie beide Welten (Hu Yao, Pernille Louise Sejlund) oder präsentieren sie sehr persönliche kompositorische Lösungen (Anders Monrad, Mette Nielsen, Kasper Rofelt, Benjamin de Murashkin und Ruomei Chen).

Von der ersten bis zur letzten Minute habe ich mit Spannung, Freude und Staunen zugehört. Manchmal war es sogar schwer zu unterscheiden, woher welche Musik kommt. Ein gutes Zeichen, denke ich. Wieder einmal erweist sich das „kleine" Dänemark (damit wohl stellvertretend für viele skandinavische Länder) als Hort stilistisch-ästhetischer Pluralität jenseits festgefahrener akademischer Begrenzungen, wie sie so in Deutschland etwa mit seinem faktisch klar umrissenen Bild, was sich in der „Neuen Musik" ziemt, kaum denkbar wäre.

OUR Recordings hat dem Projekt alle nur denkbare Liebe und Sorgfalt angedeihen lassen: Aufnahmequalität, ausführliche Werkkommentare, Design – alles vom Feinsten! Herausgekommen ist eine der aufregendsten, inspirierendsten und inspiriertesten Blockflöten-CDs der vergangenen Jahre.

Michala Petris Ost-West-Projekt markiert den Idealfall eines interkulturellen Dialogs: Musik, die mir Hoffnung gibt, dass die Zeitgenössische Tonkunst eine Zukunft hat!

Heinz Braun (20.07.2009)
Künstlerische Qualität:
  10
Bewertungsskala: 1-10
Klangqualität:
  10

Gesamteindruck:
  10
 

Komponisten/Werke Interpreten
Y. Yao Hu:
• Rong (Fusion)

M. Mette Nielsen:
• Stream

R. Rui Li:
• Peng Zhuang (Sparkling/Collision)

P.L. Pernille Louise Sejlund:
• Butterfly-Rain

Ch. Chen Gang:
• The Greeting from Afar

A. Anders Monrad:
• East/West-project 16

S. Siqin Chaoketu:
• Yan Gui (The wild goose comes back home)

K. Kasper Rofelt:
• Circonflex

R. Ruomei Chen:
• Jue (Very rare and fine jade)

B. de Benjamin de Murashkin:
• Cascades

Michala Petri
Blockflöte
Chen Yue
Xiao


Klassik Heute Magazine

Michala Petri, recorder
Chen Yue, xiao and dizi
Dialogue - East Meets West
Review on Dialogue-East meets West in Fono Forum,-Germany
Fono Forum
11 July 2009
They are Champion on their instrument,- Michala Petri, the brilliant Danish Recorderplayer and Chen Yue from China, a virtuoso on Xiao and Dizi, 2 traditional Chinese Bamboo flutes. For this "Ladie-Duo" 5 young Danish and 5 young Chinese composers have been written a composition. An exciting project, under the Theme " East meets West" with an eccentric sound mix and touch of Excotic that is hot heard evryday.Inspiring! N-H
Music 4 stars out of 5 stars
Klang 5 stars
Fono Forum

Michala Petri and Lars Hannibal
Café Vienna
19th Century Café Music
Excellent review of 'Café Vienna' in The Schubertian 66 (January 2010).
The Schubertian 66
17 June 2009
(2) Café Vienna: 19th-Century Café Music performed by Michala Petri (recorder) and Lars Hannibal (guitar). OUR Recordings 6.220601 (2009)                         
All who have been to Vienna will recognise the importance of the coffee-house in the social ambience of the city, perhaps not as significant now as it once was yet still a vibrant part of its culture. 'Café Vienna' is an imaginative reconstruction of a typical café concert. As Joshua Cheek observes in the most interesting CD booklet, in this particular programme "recorder and guitar have formed the imaginary 'house band' in order to recreate the experience of enjoying a leisurely Sunday afternoon Kaffeeklatsch in Vienna c.1800." While Schubert is not represented there is almost certainly some music here that Schubert would have heard. All are arrangements of compositions originally written for other instrumental combinations. The most substantial work is Mauro Giuliani's three-movement Gran Duetto Concertante op.52 for violin or flute and guitar. As Giuliani (1781-1829) was the official concert artist for the celebrations of the Congress of Vienna (1814-15) that marked the end of the Napoleonic Wars, this piece, with its final Rondo Militaire, may have been performed frequently at the time. The Fantaisie sur un Air National Anglais op.102 by the guitar virtuoso Ferdinando Carulli (1770-1841), originally for violin and guitar, takes the form of a slow introduction followed by the British national anthem as the theme for a set of variations. The material is more or less equally distributed between recorder and guitar and each has an opportunity to shine. In the Fantaisie sur des Airs Nationaux Francais op.226 by Joseph Küffner (1776-1856), the French national anthem has pride of place. In 1795, two years before Schubert was born, Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) wrote six pieces for mandolin with keyboard accompaniment. Only four of these have survived, including the Sonatina in C minor WoO 43a and the Sonatina in C major WoO 44a. The three final items – the Introduction, Theme and Variations op.32 by the wind-instrument virtuoso Ernest Krähmer (1795-1837), the Potpourri on Themes of Beethoven and Rossini by the violin virtuoso Josef Mayseder (1789-1863) and the Variations on an Austrian Folk Tune by Carl Scheindienst (c.1800) - were written for the csakan, a folk instrument with the same range as the alto recorder. The Danish duo of Michala Petri and Lars Hannibal give sparkling performances of all the pieces and admirably recreate the atmosphere of an early 19th-century Viennese coffee concert.
The Schubertian 66

Michala Petri, recorder
Chen Yue, xiao and dizi
Dialogue - East Meets West
Dialogue: East Meets West [Hybrid SACD] All Music Guide, America
All Music Guide
19 May 2009
All Music Guide, America by Uncle Dave Lewis:

Our Recordings' Dialogue: East Meets West features an unusual collaboration on a unique combination of instruments as Danish recorder virtuoso Michala Petri joins Chen Yue, a Chinese virtuoso on the Chinese xiao and dizi, both flutes, although the xiao is end-blown, whereas the dizi is more like a transverse flute; they are likewise made of different kinds of bamboo. As literature for this particular instrumental combination has been heretofore nonexistent, Petri and Chen have commissioned 10 pieces for the album, 5 each from Danish composers and Chinese composers. They have obtained a very interesting slate of results; in some cases the Chinese composers have turned up pieces, such as in Ruomei Chen's Jue, that are a tad more readily recognizable with avant-garde styles than the Danish ones, making clear that in China experimental composition has a bit more cachet and perceived freshness than in the West, where it is seen in some circles as being a little played out. Not so Mette Nielsen, whose lovely Stream incorporates well-adjudged elements of improvisation, whereas Chinese composer Li Rui's Peng Zhuang and Siqin Chaoketu's Yan Gui are strongly rooted in traditional Chinese folk idioms; Butterfly-Rain by Pernille Louise Sejlund is a beautiful wash of flute texture that has a programmatic sense of organization and belongs to neither side of the divide; this and the Chaoketu are obvious highlights.

There are no other instruments used than those played by Petri and Chen; no piano accompaniment, traditional Chinese instrumental group, use of percussion, or anything else. As a result, Dialogue: East Meets West is a bit of a tightrope walk — the high-pitched instrument players are on their own in putting across the entire 68-minute disc. And for that it never gets boring, although one may want to listen to Dialogue: East Meets West in two halves in order to ingest it more easily. One thing that is striking about the music of Harry Partch is that he built his own instruments and devised his own harmonic building blocks, and therefore created a kind of music from scratch that has no easy reference to other kinds of music. Petri and Chen have done much the same thing here; after awhile one moves away from the idea that these instruments are members of the flute family and into an area of listening that is of its own character and consisting of relatively light, distinctly feminine qualities. Dialogue: East Meets West is a disc that definitely rewards repeated exposure as details gradually reveal themselves, and while the composer commissions provide variety, there is no one piece that dominates the whole puzzle; it is a singular and pleasant, but by no means altogether unchallenging, musical journey that is an ideal offering for taking in the season of spring.
All Music Guide

Michala Petri and Lars Hannibal
Café Vienna
19th Century Café Music
Review on Cafe Vienna in Music Web International
Music Web International
18 May 2009
The booklet has an interesting note about the history of Viennese coffee houses. The listener is invited to imagine being present on a leisurely Sunday afternoon in one of these houses sometime around 1800 and listening to these players as the "house band". I have no idea whether such a band might have comprised recorder and guitar - the sound and pitch of the recorder might tend to make conversation difficult in a small room, but for the non-scholar this is probably no matter when the result is as enjoyable as it is here. I note that none of the works on the disc were in fact written for this combination - most were for flute, violin or "csaken" (a folk instrument similar in size and range to a recorder) and guitar, but the arrangements are convincing and there is no feeling that the music has been given a inappropriate face-lift.

Only Beethoven and to a lesser extent Giuliani are familiar names as composers, and even then the former is represented by two of his least characteristic works, originally for mandolin and piano. They are charming miniatures which do sound better in their original and more tangy scoring but the arrangements are tasteful and do no great harm to the style and character of the music. The Giuliani is a bigger work in every way, in three movements ending with a Rondo Militaire. It is essentially a sunny piece full of Italianate melodies and charm. Most of the other pieces draw on other works to some extent. The Carulli for instance is based on "God save the Queen" and the Küffner includes variations on the Marseillaise. Both are entertaining and the latter is especially comical in the indignities it imposes on the tune.

Nothing on this disc is of any great musical consequence but everything is full of charm. For the most part the players simply present the music for what it is, without affectation or obvious showmanship but with considerable style, panache and, especially as far as the recorder is concerned, virtuosity. Taken in excess it might seem like an excessively sweet cup of coffee, but taken in judicious quantities it provides rare delight. The recording is clear and the booklet full and interesting - just the way to present unfamiliar material.

John Sheppard 

Music Web International
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