all reviews
currently showing records for:
Kim Sjøgren, violin
Lars Hannibal, guitar
Journey
Contemporary Danish Works
Danish Music Magazine (DMT) review on Journey
DMT
04 December 2011
This collection of world premiere recordings, as Lars Hannibal proudly announces in the liner notes, is very exciting when looking at the context.  All the pieces are especially written for him and Kim Sjøgren, which makes the collection just as homogeneous, as "Taking off souls" is tangled!

There is an advantage to both parts - in this case the program allowes you to observe how four long-established composers in the Danish tradition expressed themselves about twenty years ago ( the youngest is Palle Mikkelborg, 47 years old at that time).
Two of them - Koppel and Holmboe - are amongst the leading composers in the 20th century Danish music history, which makes one listen with great interest.

To begin with the end: in the long run I think that the combination of violin and guitar sounds a little too similar, but one cannot resist zooming in on the virtuoso treatment of the instruments, exactly as expected. It is highly enjoyable musically, but for the three elder composers the awareness remains with
the sound and the expected ways of expression.

The overall attention for me gathers around "Everything Matters" by Palle Mikkelborg, identically with the music for the ballet "Journey".

In addition to Lars Hannibal and Kim Sjøgren, Palle Mikkelborg himself plays the keyboards - a  pre-recorded tape. The music is inspired from an essay by ballet dancer Erik Bruhn, and was later the point of origin for the ballet by coreographer Christopher Bruce. The composition takes almost half an hour, and in that sense dominates the cd. One can say that the cd comes in two parts, in which the first part, as I hear it, is the most interesting.
DMT

Kim Sjøgren, violin
Lars Hannibal, guitar
Journey
Contemporary Danish Works
ARG Review on Journey
American Review Guide
04 December 2011
"Each of these pieces is really good music-expressive, interesting, inventive, beautiful!"
JOURNEY: Contemporary Danish Works for Violin & Guitar
Palle Mikkelborg: Everything matters (1988)
Herman D. Koppel: Duo for violin and guitar op. 116 (1987)
Jorgen Jersild: 10 Impromptu (1987)
Vagn Holmboe: Duo Concertato op. 167 (1987)
Kim Sjogren, Violin
Lars Hannibal, Guitar
Catalogue Number: OUR Recordings 8.226902
This issue brought two recordings by Sjogran and Hannibal, one of the works of Giuliani and this one of four contemporary Danish composers. The Giuliani was quite fine, but this is a revelation. Of these composers, only Holmboe was known to me, but Palle Mikkelborg's Everything Matters is a multimedia work for guitar, violin, tape, and dancer. The music has the haunting spirituality of Tavener's work-I'd love to see the choreography. It is set in nine movements, alternating between an ethereal atonality and mundane waltzes. The mood is mostly quiet and contemplative. It is very moving.
Herman Koppel's Duo is a three-movement sonata-like structure with echoes of Bartok and Walton. Jorgen Jersild's 10 Impromptus is a delightful set of brief vignettes, most shorter than a minute. This is magical music - fairies dancing, elves singing. It has been a while since I heard new music with such affecting simplicity, such comforting purity.
Vagn Holmboe is, after Nielsen, Denmark's best known composer. The Duo Concertante has some folk influences and also recalls Bartok but is gentler.
The players have collaborated for three decades. Each is a fine player with an excellent technique and tasteful elegance. They clearly love these works. You will, too. - KEATON
American Review Guide

Michala Petri, recorder
City Chamber Orchestra of Hong Kong
English Recorder Concertos
Great review in cjklassisk of English Recoder Concertos
cjklassisk
01 December 2011
Fornem anmeldelse at John Christiansen af English Recorder Concertos:

Opdagelse af en blokfløjtekoncert:

**** "Michala Petri har indspillet tre koncerter for blokfløjte af britiske komponister. Igen spiller hun funklende, elegant, lyrisk og fornøjeligt, når det er på sin plads. Og det mærkværdige sker. Det er ægte engelsk musik, og alligevel er det på en måde også sommerdansk. Først i Richard Harveys "Concerto Incantato", et prisvindende værk, som Michala Petri uropførte i Hong Kong. Der er fem spændende satser af tilpas længde, som man får lyst til at genhøre. Der er ikke en takt for meget og ikke en takt for lidt. Det er vital og liflig musik, som Michala Petri forståeligt nok er faldet for.

I to omgange går man derefter tilbage i to generationer til Malcolm Arnolds blokfløjte-koncert fra 1988 og til Gordon Jacobs suite fra 1957 for blokfløjte/recorder og strygere. Det er ægte britisk, det er  rapsodisk nuanceret musik, men sandelig om man ikke aner Carl Nielsens skygge i Arnolds koncert.

Cd'en er også blevet indspillet on location med City Chamber Orchestra of Hong Kong dirigeret af Jean Thorel. Preben Iwan tog også turen til Hong Kong og har ansvaret og æren for fylden og klarheden i den nærmest fuldendte tekniske velklang. Der er gode, fyldige noter på engelsk. CD'en er udgivet af Michala Petris og Lars Hannibals eget pladeselskab OUR Recordings. Jeg vender tilbage til flere af OUR Recordings udgivelser "(4 stjerner: Recordings 29901).jcklassisk 18.juni 2014
cjklassisk

Kim Sjøgren, violin
Lars Hannibal, guitar
Journey
Contemporary Danish Works
The Musician, Review on Journey
The Musician Magazine
21 November 2011
Two of the outsanding figures on the Dansh music scene, Kim Sjøgren and Lars Hannibal have joined forces in the interpretation of some of the most important Danish composers Palle Mikkelborg, Vagn Holmboe, Jørgen Jersild and Herman D. Koppel.

Wonderful Danish music in an equally great performance;  anything else would, frankly said, have been a surprise....
The Musician Magazine

Michala Petri, recorder
City Chamber Orchestra of Hong Kong
English Recorder Concertos
The Recorder Magazine on English Recorder Concertos
The Recorder Magazine
16 November 2011
Described in the liner notes as " A new concerto for the Harry Potter generation", Richard Harvey's "Concerto Incantato" certainly cast a musical spell from its opening bars. It was composed for Michala Petri and commisioned by Leanne Nicholls  for the City Chamber Orchestra of Hong Kong's tenth anniversary concert in 2009. It is a substantial Work in five contrasting movements about 30 minutes and is firmly in the harmonic and melodic mainstream. Harvey is a recorder virtuoso in his own right and an award-winning composer for film and television. It is therefore no surprise that this work not only contains testing yet perfectly idiomatic writing for recorder, but also a wealth of colourful and appealing music. The first movement, "Sortilegio" (Sorcery), in which the sopranino, soprano and treble recorder interplay with the orchestra are an integral part ot its sparkling textures, leads into the very contrasting "Nature Morta" (Still Life) where the tenor recorder sings a rather wistful song over the husted accompaniment. This atmosphere is abruptly dispersed by the third movement " Danza Spiriti" ( Dance of the spirits), a will-o'- the wisp scherzo of considerable energy. The fourth movement "Canzone Sacra" (Sacred Song) restores a contemplative mood and features a haunting humn-like melody for treble recorder. Soprrano recorder arpeggios introduce the fifth movement "Incantesimi" (Spells) before a lively Renaissance-style dance emerges, the course of which is interrupted by touching restatement of the previous movement's melody. However, a return to the dance brings this spell-binding concerto to a brilliant conclusion.
Sir Malcolm Arnold's "Concerto for Recorder and Orchestra" OP.133 was written for Michala Petri in 1988 in a final period of compositional activity. Some of his late works display a sparseness of texture which in the case of the Recorder Concerto is a distinct contributory factor in achieving a balance between soloist and the orchestra containing brass and woodwind in additiion to the strings.The first and third movement of the three movements are virtuosic yet scherzo-like, and it is the Lento middle movement that carries the emotional weight of the work. It takes the form of a passacaglia and captures a very semilar mood to that of the Chaconna in his Sonatina for recorder composed thirty-five years earlier, a perfect foil to the music of the outer movements, particularly the march-like character of the finale.
Composed for Carl Dolmetsch towards the end of 1957 and first performed by him in January 1958, Gordon Jacob's Suite for treble recorder and strings received immediate critical acclaim. In a period of changing musical tastes it is a Work that has retained its place in the recorder repertoire and rightfully so - it is a masterpiece, perfectly written for the instrument. The sheer ebullience of its quick movements and the yearning yet warm music of the "Lament" and "Pavane" continue to captivate players and audience alike. It was during the early 1980s that Michala Petri took the Suite into her repertoire (and memoroable recorded it) and contacted the composer to seek his advise on performance. Their meeting inspired Jacob to compose and dedicate his last Work for recorder, the "Sonatina" to her.
This is a first-rate disc; recording and visual presentation are impressive, the orchestral playing decisive yet sympathetic and the three Works form a wonderfully contrasted programme. Michala Petri's playing, it goes wothout saying, is impaccable and her music interpretation vivid.
Andrew Mayes,- May 2013
The Recorder Magazine

Lars Hannibal, guitar
Chen Yue, bamboo flute (xiao)
Spirits
East Meets West
New US review on Spirits in Fanfare Magazine
Fanfare Magazine
13 November 2011
"Spirits" pairs Hannibal with Chen Yue, a Chinese bamboo flutist, in a mellow recital combining traditional English, Chinese, Japanese, Hungarian, and Catalan music with one piece each by Bach (the ever-popular Air on the G String), Vivaldi (the Largo from The Four Season's Winter, played in a faster-than-usual tempo), and Ulrik Neumann (a nostalgic Love Waltz with a Russian soul). Chen is a sensitive and expressive musician. Her lovely tone, tasteful slides, and exquisite timing beautify everything she plays; her performances of Chinese music are especially memorable. Lars Hannibal is an attentive accompanist and a virtuoso in his own right. His sophisticated arrangements—in the Chinese pieces he convincingly imitates traditional ch'in and pipa technique—treat both instruments as true partners. The two also perform as soloists—three tracks each—and Chen overdubs two flutes in Autumn Piece.
Fanfare Magazine

Michala Petri, recorder
Lan Shui, conductor
Chinese Recorder Concertos
East Meets West
Great review in Danish Newspaper Kristeligt Dagblad on Chinese Recorder Concertos
Kristeligt Dagblad
02 August 2011
Kristeligt Dagblad 13.  oktober  2010, 1. sektion, side 6

4 Chinese Recorder Concertos. Dirigent: Lan Shui. Sjællands Symfoniorkester . Solist: Michala Petri. OUR Recordings. 5 stjerner ud af 6 
 
Strukturerne i kinesernes musikalske tonesprog kan lyde fremmede i vestlige ører. Men når de indgår i en syntese med vestlig musik, som det er tilfældet med de fire koncerter på Michala Petris nye cd, er der tale om grænseoverskridende musik. Og det er - vil jeg gerne understrege - ikke svært at lytte til. Tværtimod. Men man begejstres over meget mere end Michala Petris hele vejen igennem fyldige, intelligente og ekvilibristisk sikre fløjtespil, for Sjællands Symfoniorkester under ledelse af Lan Shui, den kinesiske chefdirigent, spiller med en engageret direkthed og lidenskab i det gennemsigtige, innovative klangbillede. De fire koncerter kan deles op i to dele.
Tang Jianpings " Fei Ge" og Ma Shui-longs " Bambusfløjtekoncert" rummer begge et væld af iørefaldende melodier, herlig energi og varm, udtryksmættet lyd. Sidstnævnte er et fornemt møde mellem øst og vest, modelleret som det er over Liszts eller Francks cykliske form, men tydeligvis piloteret dybt nede i den kinesiske folkemusik. De to andre koncerter - Brigt Shengs " Flute Moon" og Chen Yis " The Ancient Chinese Beauty" - kræver lidt mere af lytteren.
" Flute Moon" henter sit klangbillede i vestlig modernisme a la Stravinskij med buldrende trommer, hidsige strygere og en mere empatisk, følsom fløjte. Men stadig med retningen intakt i denne syntese af østlig mystik og vestlig eksperimenteren.
Chen Yi er i sit værk inspireret af forskellige aspekter ved den kinesiske kultur og har derfor ladet satstitlerne lyde navne som Lerfigurerne, De gamle totems og Det dansende blæk. Det er cd'ens mindst vægtige komposition, men stadig et interessant udtryk for det store kinesiske riges musikalske rigdom. De fire koncerter blev i øvrigt indspillet i forlængelse af en koncert, som Petri, dirigent og orkester gav i april i år, som kastede 5 stjerner af sig her i avisen. Det gør denne cd også. Køb den endelig!.
kultur@k.dk
 



Kristeligt Dagblad

Michala Petri, recorder
Lan Shui, conductor
Chinese Recorder Concertos
East Meets West
Great new review in US Music Magazine Fanfare on Chinese Recorder Concertos
Fanfare Magazine
31 January 2011
TANG JIANPING Fei Ge. BRIGHT SHENG Flute Moon. MA SHUI-LONG Bamboo Flute Concerto. CHEN YI The Ancient Chinese Beauty ● Michala Petri (rcr); Lan Shui, cond; Copenhagen P ● OUR 6.220603 (Hybrid multichannel SACD: 71:29)
Once a busy recording artist for Philips and RCA Red Seal, Danish virtuoso Michala Petri (with guitarist and lutenist Lars Hannibal) launched her own label in 2006. This is OUR Recordings's 13th release, and the third in its "Dialogue—East Meets West" series. This collection of "Chinese Recorder Concertos" is, to enlist a perhaps overused word, delightful, and deserves to be brought to the attention of a broad audience.
If you don't believe me, try the opening work by Tang Jianping, who was born in 1955. The title's English translation is "Flying Song," a reference to a style of folk singing indigenous to a region of southwest China. As a courtship song intended to be projected over long distances, it must be both penetrating and appealing—think of the songs from the Auvergne region set by Joseph Canteloube. With its rich scoring and tunefulness, Fei Ge also seems to be motivated by the same forces that led George Enescu to compose his two Romanian Rhapsodies. The languages are very different, of course, but the impact is quite similar. This will go to the top of my list of musical pick-me-ups. Tang Jianping originally composed this work for bamboo flute and a ensemble of various Asian instruments. The arrangement for Western instruments performed here is the composer's own.
Bright Sheng and Chen Yi are more familiar to Western listeners. The first movement of the former's Flute Moon ("Chi Lin's Dance") is an athletic and often thunderous toccata in which the dancing of the mythical Chinese unicorn or "dragon horse" is evoked. The combination of the piping recorder with the heavy stamping of the orchestra creates an effect that is both bizarre and beguiling. The atmospheric second movement (also titled "Flute Moon") is based on a classical melody dating from the Song Dynasty. After a tensely quiet opening, the movement erupts with dramatic gestures and a strong melodic profile, and then returns to the opening mood. Chen Yi currently teaches at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. The Ancient Chinese Beauty was composed specifically for Michala Petri, who premiered it in Beijing in 2008. Its language is more difficult, and what grabs the ear most, at least initially, is the composer's employment and combining of instrumental timbres in much the same way that an abstract painter uses a variety of paints and brushes. The three movements are "The Clay Figurines," "The Ancient Totems," and "The Dancing Ink." Less than 15 minutes long, The Ancient Chinese Beauty is just the right length for its materials. The tenor recorder is used in the middle movement, and the alto recorder in the first and third. The third movement is an exciting moto perpetuo characterized by the composer's insistent use of repeated notes.
The Bamboo Flute Concerto by Ma Shui-Long (b. 1939) blends traditional Western gestures—particularly those associated with the genre of the Romantic concerto—with melodies in a traditional Chinese style. As the title suggests, Ma composed it for the bang di, but of course here it is performed on a recorder—a sopranino, unless I am mistaken. It is not a very adventurous concerto, but it is appealing, and it is an appropriate foil for the works by Bright Sheng and Chen Yi that frame it.
Michala Petri recently turned 50 and shows no signs of relinquishing her enthusiastic yet serene mastery over her instruments of choice. She plays all of these works, not just The Ancient Chinese Beauty, as if they were composed just for her. If anyone still doubts the recorder's place as an instrument worthy of the same attention as its cousin the flute, Petri's playing here should put that to rest. The Copenhagen Philharmonic accompanies her idiomatically, and with sensitivity to this music's many shapes and colors. Kudos to Lan Shui, its chief conductor since 2007, for making this happen. Finally, the booklet notes (in English and Chinese) thoughtfully guide one through the program, and the SACD technology makes a spectacular noise, from the recorder's most piercing upper registers to the granitic power of the orchestra's lowest notes.
This is Want List material. Raymond Tuttle
Fanfare Magazine

Palle Mikkelborg
Going To Pieces - Without Falling Apart
Great review in Gramophone on "Going to Pieces - Without falling Apart"!
Gramophone Magazine
17 January 2011
Concertos from a founder of the "Nordic jazz sound".
No one could accuse Palle Mikkelborg of doing things by halves and, while the trumpeter admits to this being his largest-scale project for some time, the temporal dimension speak for itself. The title, taken from that of a book by Mark Epstein, indicates the work's scope: a 45-minute concerto (for harp and violin in 2004 but with the latter part revised for recorder eight years later) comprising 12 continuous movements, each with its own descriptive title and (in the booklet) an additional sentence which sets the scene, yet such hardly necessary given this music's quiet though not insubstantial eloquence as it wends its course through memories and evocations of a past which may never have existed – but should have done. Helen Davies contributes some limpid passagework, often with an unobtrusive Celtic element, while Michala Petri is at her most fluidly imaginative as the recorder interweaves with harp and strings in a constant flow of dexterous polyphony.
The principal work is followed by "Afterthoughts", Mikkelborg's recasting of the former's salient ideas (in collaboration with Thomas Li) for trumpet and strings that allows ample rein to his brand of understated virtuosity. The South Jutland Symphony strings are unfailingly sensitive in their response, while the sonic warmth and stylish presentation maintain the high standards set by OUR Recordings imprint. This is not the music that confronts the big issues of life head on but its leisurely unfolding conjures a quiet profundity that is its own justification – soothing and stimulating in equal measure.
Richard Whitehouse, Gramophone October 2013,

Gramophone Magazine

Michala Petri, recorder
Lan Shui, conductor
Chinese Recorder Concertos
East Meets West
Musical Pointer from UK on Chinese Recorder Concertos
Musical Pointer Magazine
10 January 2011
UR Recordings 6.220603

All these items are of important musico-historical interest.

Each of the composers, born in 1939 and the '50s respectively, suffered under the ravages of Mao's CUltural Revolution, and their various rapprochments with the West are certainly worth hearing from that perspective.

But the only woman composer amongst them, Chen Yi, who studied composition at Columbia University and became a professor of composition at the University of Missouri–Kansas City Conservatory of Music and Dance, is the one whose concerto (and other music of hers) would likely find a welcome place on the European concert scene.

The performances, recording and background information are all splendid and, with those caveats, the disc is to be warmly welcomed.

Peter Grahame Woolf
Musical Pointer Magazine

Palle Mikkelborg
Going To Pieces - Without Falling Apart
Very fine Danish review in Jazznyt on "Going to Pieces-Without falling Apart"
Jazznyt Magazine
10 January 2011
I jazzens verdenshistorie er han bedst kendt som komponisten bag Aura. Musik der var skrevet til Miles Davis og senere blev indspillet med Miles Davis i front. Palle Mikkelborg er også kendt som en gudsbenådet trompetist. Her må jeg blankt erkende at jeg ikke bare nyder, at lytte til Palle Mikkelborg. Jeg er fan! Helt døv er jeg dog ikke og mener, at det ikke er alt hans læber har rørt der er blevet til guld - men tæt på!. Så da jeg hørte at der var en ny plade på vej med Palle Mikkelborg, kontaktede jeg pladeselskabet bag udgivelsen, da det ikke er et selskab jeg normalt har kontakt med.




Coveret prydes af et billede med Mikkelborg i det man nærmest kan kalde for signaturpositionen. De andre medvirkende er også nævnt. Fruen og harpenisten Helen Davies, blokfløjtevirtuosen Michala Petri og Sønderjyllands Symfoniorkester (South Jutland Symphony Orchestra) under ledelse af dirigenten Henrik Vagn Christensen. CD'en placeres i afspilleren og ud af højttalerne strømmer symfonisk musik. jeg beroliger mig selv med, at det nok bare er indledningen inden Palle kommer på. Men Palle kommer ikke på!? Det er i stedet en plade med musik af Palle Mikkelborg og ikke med. I bedste klassiske tradition er komponisten nævnt med de største bogstaver og som var det Bach eller Mozart.




Men hvad er det så for noget musik der strømmer ud af højttalerne? Blokfløjten og harpen er indlysende nok i centrum. Oprindeligt var musikken skrevet for harpe og violin. Violindelen er så ændret til Michala Petri's blokfløjte. Palle Mikkelborg er på ingen måde en novice ud i symfonisk musik. I 1975 lavede han den symfoniske og fortællende Dexter Gordon-hyldest More than you know. Her næsten fyrre år senere, er han stadig en fortæller. Gennem musikken beretter han om livet. Morgen, sol, sommernatten, sommerregn, mysterier, en afrikansk pige, en kinesisk pige og en vuggevise mens de voksne taler. Det er opløftende og berigende. Storladent og nærværende. Palle Mikkelborg er en ener i dansk musik. Med dette album har han sat et markant aftryk som klassisk komponist. Da jeg hørte nummeret Chanting Monks kom jeg til at tænke på Mikkelborgs Stenalderjazz fra Gasolin' pladen Efter endnu en dag. Indledningerne er meget lig hinanden.




Pladens sidste nummer hedder Afterthoughts og er med trompetisten Palle Mikkelborg i centrum. I samarbejde med Thomas Li har han skabt nogle improvisationer over Going to pieces... En værdig og meget Mikkelborgsk finale, hvor min indre Mikkelborg-fan er fuldt ud tilfredsstillet!
Jazznyt Magazine

Palle Mikkelborg
Going To Pieces - Without Falling Apart
The Classical Reviewer on "Going to Pieces-Without falling Apart"
The Classical Reviewer
03 January 2011
http://theclassicalreviewer.blogspot.co.uk/2013/09/excellent-performances-from-michala.html

Excellent performances from Michala Petri (recorder) and Helen Davies (harp) with the South Jutland Symphony Orchestra under Henrik Vagn Christensen in attractive work that fuses classical, world and jazz in a new release from OUR Recordings
The Danish jazz trumpeter, composer, arranger and record producer Palle Mikkelborg (b.1941) www.mikkelborg.dk  started playing professionally in 1960, and has since been a dominant figure on the Danish and international progressive jazz scene.
He has more than a hundred published credits and has collaborated with such artists as Gil Evans, Terje Rypdal, Miles Davis, Jan Garbarek, Gary Peacock, Shankar and Done Cherry. In 2001 he was awarded the Nordic Council Music Prize.

In 2004 Mikkelborg was asked to write a major work for two soloists and string orchestra which resulted in the work on a new release on the OUR Recordings label www.ourrecordings.com , Going to Pieces Without Falling Apart. The inspiration and title, Mikkelborg tells us, came from the title of a book by Mark Epstein Going to Pieces Without Falling Apart. This phrase summarised Mikkelborg's own attempts, in this work, to embark on a spiritual journey touching on his meeting with musicians from many cultural spheres.

Originally written for harp, violin and string orchestra, the violin part was revised for recorder in 2012 for Michala Petri www.michalapetri.com  who performs on this disc together with Helen Davies (harp) www.helendavies.dk  and the South Jutland Symphony Orchestra www.sdjsymfoni.dk  under Henrik Vagn Christensen, as well as the composer playing trumpet.

Going to Pieces Without Falling Apart is in twelve sections or movements played without a break.
The Dawn Chorus opens this work with a slightly distanced ethereal sound of a solo recorder before the strings and harp arrive. This is a wonderful opening, very still and atmospheric and beautifully played by Michala Petri. Strings and harp create some wonderful sounds before the dawn arrives with the return of the recorder and the feel of awakening activity.

A calm melody for recorder and hovering strings introduces Morning Raga. The harp eventually enters to continue the calm melody. Sunrise appears with the recorder and shimmering strings before the recorder introduces a lively tune with harp accompaniment. Strings enter again to fill out the tune, which has something of a South American feel or certainly ethnic feel. The music calms as the recorder joins in a quieter melody with a repeated string motif behind it.

A playful little theme for recorder and harp leads into The African Girl. Strings join quietly as the recorder and harp die away but the recorder and harp return with little surges from the strings. At times the strings create an atmosphere of open spaces, before the music builds to a climax, then quietening for A Summer Nightfall where the harp plays gently to a string accompaniment. The recorder interrupts several times with a lovely tune, again slightly distanced. This is a terrific moment, very atmospheric, with ethereal strings, so hushed – fully evoking a summer night in a warm climate.

Chanting Monks opens with heavier strings slowly ruminating over a theme. The melancholy sounding recorder enters, followed by the harp before the strings build the melody with harp and recorder contributing lovely arabesques and flourishes. The music quietens and the solo harp plays, before the strings join, as does the recorder in a meditative section. Gentle Summer Rain has a descending motif before strange sounds appear, created by plucked strings giving an attractive sound of rain drops in quite an original way.

A bold recorder theme is soon taken up by the harp in A Spiritual Carousel, before the strings enter, imitating a version of the rising and falling motif as the music increases in dynamics and tempo in a kind of moto perpetuo. The music eventually leads to a playful theme shared between the recorder and solo violin with strings accompaniment. There is a violent surge from the strings before slowly quietening with the recorder and harp joining in a strange theme, conjuring up an ancient atmosphere with the feeling of ethnic pipes imitated by recorder. The moto perpetuo suddenly leaps in before the music quietens. 

The strange sounds of A Golden Mystery has the recorder providing ghostly sounds before being joined by the harp and strings in a more serene moment to which the recorder responds in a lovely movement. Both Michala Petri and Helen Davies give some terrific playing.

Strange harmonies in the strings open quietly in The Chinese Girl before a melody slowly emerges. The recorder suddenly enters with a flourish before the harp and strings continue this subtly oriental melody with further interruptions from the recorder. There is a lovely recorder part beautifully played by Petri. A solo section for harp with fine playing from Davies leads to Lullabies While the Adults are Talking. Murmuring voices are slowly joined by the solo recorder. The recorder and voices eventually give way to a string melody with the recorder occasionally joining in. Soon the murmuring voices return with the solo harp joining them and picking out a melody with some lovely flourishes. It is as though a child is dropping in and out of sleep. Helen Davies provides some particularly fine harp playing here. Eventually the strings, harp and recorder join together in drooping phrases leading to the final movement.

Shadow Waltz opens with the recorder taking up a theme to quietly swirling strings and harp accompaniment creating a kind of dreamlike waltz, ending quietly on a low harp note and recorder phrase.

Palle Mikkelborg states that he wished to include the sound of his trumpet in this journey using some of the themes and orchestrations. This resulted in Afterthoughts which opens with fragmented trumpet phrases entering against string sounds. Jazz like in their sound, it creates a strange yet compelling combination. The music fades before string chords heave slowly from the depths. The trumpet sounds a few fragmented notes whilst the strings appear almost imperceptibly providing strange sounds. The solo trumpet builds a lively melody before the strings alone make strange sounds again created by plucked strings. The trumpet again joins in jazz like short phrases whilst the strings create some ethereal sounds with drooping phrases and discords. The languid sound of the trumpet appears before giving an upwards flourish, leaving the strings alone to fade out.

Mikkelborg has created a real fusion of classical, world and jazz, not merely some kind of cross over. If musical boundaries are really to be broken then surely this attractive music shows at least one way to do it.

Performances from the South Jutland Symphony Orchestra under Henrik Vagn Christensen are excellent and there is superb playing from Michala Petri and Helen Davies and the composer himself playing the trumpet. These artists draw so much colour and atmosphere from this unusual music. The recording is excellent and there are informative booklet notes including a short essay from the composer.


The Classical Reviewer

Michala Petri, recorder
Lan Shui, conductor
Chinese Recorder Concertos
East Meets West
UK Classic Music Magazine review on Chinese Recorder Concertos!
Classic Music Magazine
31 December 2010
Recording of the Fourthnight. 4 out of 5 stars

Todays composers in China are achieving east-west fusion with none of the formalism of previous decades. From the wild melange of rock,jazz and classical in Tang Jianping's "Feige" to the finely crafted classicism of Chen Yi's "The Ancient Chinese Beauty", individuality and energy abound. Even 71-year-old Ma Shui-Long's "Bamboo Flute Concerto"  deftly mixes traditional Chines and western traditions with a sence of freschness. All four works make demands on virtuosity that few other than Petri could meet!
Classic Music Magazine

Michala Petri, recorder
Lan Shui, conductor
Chinese Recorder Concertos
East Meets West
Review on Chinese Recorder Concertos in Vienna based International Music Magazine " Der Neue Merker"
Der Neue Merker
07 December 2010
CHINESE RECORDER CONCERTOS – East meets West – mit Mikala Petri
OUR 6.220603
Hier entführt den interessierten Zuhörer die dänische Blockflöten-Virtuosin Mikala Petri in eine exotische Klangwelt. Begleitet wird sie von der Copenhagen Philharmonic unter der authentischen Leitung des chinesischen Dirigenten Lan Shui.
Die Konzerte stammen von vier zeitgenössischen chinesischen Komponisten: Tang Jianping (Fei Ge - Flying Song), Bright Sheng (Flute Moon), Ma Shui-Iong (Bamboo Flute Concerto) und der Komponistin Chen Yi (The Ancient Chinese Beauty – das jüngste und vielleicht interessanteste Werk, UA 4/08; mir gefiel es am besten).
Wenn es pompös wird, denkt man unwillkürlich an Dmitri Tiomkins „55 Tage in Peking", wird es stimmungsvoll elegisch, erstehen vor einem Bilder der mystischen Wälder, wie man sie in künstlerischen asiatischen Fantasy-Filmen häufig sieht. – Sehr viel Aufschlussreiches lässt sich dem beiliegenden Booklet entnehmen. Eine ungemein angenehme musikalische Chinareise!
DZ
Der Neue Merker

Michala Petri, recorder
Mahan Esfahani, harpsichord
UK DK
BBC Music Magazine on UK-DK
BBC Music Magazine
04 December 2010
BBC Music Magazine

Michala Petri, fondly remembered by many as a child prodigy on the recorder, has formed a duo with the Iranian-born harpsichordist Mahan Esfahani. Their second disc, as its title suggests, consists of music from Esfahani's adopted country, the UK, and Petri's native Denmark – nearly all of it written in the later 20th century as part of the recorder revival. The exception is a recent piece by Daniel Kidane Tourbillon, which is named after a component of a watch and moves with mechanical precision before running down at the end. Britain is also represented by Malcolm Arnold's well-crafted Sonatina of 1953, Gordon Jacob's fluent Sonatina  (and an Encore for Michala exploiting her ability to sing one tune while playing another), and an arrangement of Britten's unassuming Alphine Suite. The Danish works are Henning Christiansen's fresh and lively It is Spring, with hints of birdsongs on sopranino recorder, Vagn Holmboe's Sonata, idiomatically written for both instruments, and Axel Borup-Jørgensen's Fantasia, mildly modernist in its texture and gestures.
Throughout the programme, well recorded in a Copenhagen Church, Petri plays with immaculate tuning and finger technique, crisp tonguing and well-shaped melodic line; Esfahani matches her with well-judged colours and phrasing. Anthony Burton, April 2015 BBC Music Magazine
Performance 5 Stars
Recording 4 Stars
BBC Music Magazine

Michala Petri, recorder
Lan Shui, conductor
Chinese Recorder Concertos
East Meets West
Great review on Chinese Recorder Concertos in Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung
Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung
04 December 2010
Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, 07.08.2010, Nr. 181, S. 35



Seitenüberschrift: Schallplatten und Phono

Ressort: Schallplatten und Phono



Die Blockflöte kann auch sauber klingen



Es ist alles eine Frage der Atemtechnik: Neue und wiederentdeckte Konzerte mit Michala Petri und Michael Schneider.



Haben nicht längst die beiden besten Blockflötisten der älteren Generation, Michala Petri und Michael Schneider, schlagend bewiesen, dass eine exakt angepeilte Tonhöhe kein Verzicht auf Ausdruck ist? Präzise Artikulation und eine saubere Intonation sind beim Spiel auf der Blockflöte nicht nur möglich, sie sind elementar. Letztlich handelt es sich nur um bewusste Atemkontrolle! Auch, zum Beispiel, der junge Schweizer Blockflötist Maurice Steger (letzte Veröffentlichung: ein Corelli-Album mit The English Consort bei harmonia mundi) spielt lupenrein sauber und zugleich hinreißend authentisch.



Michala Petri hat längst daheim in Dänemark ihr eigenes Label gegründet, wo ihr keine A&R-Manager der Major Labels mehr ins Repertoire hineinreden. Sie spielt nur noch das, wofür sie sich selbst interessiert. Auf diese Weise kommen herrliche Überraschungsalben zustande. Petris neuestes stellt vier brillante zeitgenössische Konzertstücke aus China vor, bei denen die Blockflöte ihre Verwandtschaft mit der Bambusflöte unter Beweis stellen muss. Da wird dann, höchst kunstvoll, doch, etwa in "The Ancient Chinese Beauty" von Chen Yi, heftig vibriert und die Flatterzunge eingesetzt, werden Unschärfen zu Stilmitteln und die Töne in klagenden Glissandofiguren schräg angeschliffen. Komponisten wie Chen Yi oder Bright Cheng gehörten zur ersten Studenten-Generation, die nach der Kulturrevolution am Pekinger Konservatorium anfingen; sie waren Mitglieder der legendären "Klasse von 1978", die ihren ganz eigenen, vitalen Weg fand zwischen westlicher Avantgarde und chinesischer Tradition. Es swingt in diesen Stücken, die erfrischend originell sind, malerisch musikantisch, zuweilen sogar frech und witzig. Der Schwierigkeitsgrad für das Soloinstrument ist sagenhaft, wunderbar die Vielfalt der Farben und Forme(l)n, die die Blockflöte hier bieten muss.




"East meets West". Chinesische Blockflötenkonzerte von Bright Sheng, Tang Jianping, Chen Yi und Ma Shui-long. Michala Petri, Copenhagen Philharmonic, Lan Shui. OUR recordings 6.220603 (Naxos)



Alle Rechte vorbehalten. (c) F.A.Z. GmbH, Frankfurt am Main

Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung

Marcus Creed, Conductor
L'amour et la foi
Vocal Music by Olivier Messiaen (1908 - 1992)
Great review on Messiaen in MusicWeb International
Music Web International
03 December 2010
Listening to this extraordinary and oh-so-original music I was reminded how Messiaen seems to exist outside the Western musical tradition. He often proceeds by repetition with no conventional development. Form is unfixed and orchestral, or perhaps one should say with these works, ensemble, colours are uniquely his own. On this CD all this is made particularly clear in the large-scale, three-movement Trois petits liturgies de la Presénce divine. The CD's title, translated as 'Love and Faith', applies very much to this work.

The disc boasts: 'This recording features Messiaen's original version for 16 solo strings and 18 sopranos". As I was coming new to this work I can't speak of a personal understanding of any other version but the scoring also uses piano, ondes martenot, celesta, vibraphone and percussion. It was written in the darkest days of the Second World War but is so overpowering joyous, especially in the second movement ('Séquence du verbe, cantique divin'), that you would never know it. When it does not bounce with Messiaen's typically inspired gamelan-type ostinati and rhythms, it stands poised in a world somewhere between the stars and eternity. All the time, especially in movement one ('Antienne de la conversation intérieure'), bird songs lash the vocal lines just like the mistle thrush I hear all day in my garden, so varied so strong and positive. The third movement ('Psalmodie de l'ubiquité par Amour'), which is over seventeen minutes long, sounds as if it once formed part of the famous 'Turangalîla Symphonie' which had yet been composed when this work was being written. The ondes martenot which Messiaen made all his own would probably sound quite 'naff' in the hands of most composers. Here its ghostly presence acts as a spiritual tool of uplifting bliss. It slinks between voices and strings like a musical version of the Holy Spirit.

The texts by the composer himself as was mostly the case, are non-biblical but seem to be a modern extension of the Old Testament 'Song of Songs' in its vague eroticisms. For example "By a kiss-throw your head overreaches the picture /divine landscape". The work hovers around A major although often uses pentatonic harmonies. This key Messiaen associated with the colour blue and with 'serene joy'. It is then exotic and exhilarating. My only quibble with the performance/recording is that the words are not always clearly heard and enunciated.

There are umpteen recordings of the motet O Sacrum convivium. This is perhaps the only text set by Messiaen which doubles up on settings from the renaissance and more recent times. I have no intention of drawing your attention to others but if you wanted to play to the 'unconvinced' this is as good a version as you could find. It possesses beauty, poise and an ideal vocal balance and blend. It passes the test every time.

There have also been several recordings of the Cinq Rechants so I will not list them. These are uniquely fascinating songs although refrains ('rechants') seems a remarkably modest title for such highly complex and virtuosic writing.

The word Turangalîla is a Sanskrit word appertaining to certain rhythmic formulas. The text of Cinq Rechants was compiled by Messiaen in Sanskrit and French but it's meaning is difficult to pin down. Christian Hildebrandt in his helpful notes quotes the composer when he says "This is a love song. This single fact is enough to guide the performers". There is a strong connection with the Tristan and Isolde legend, which had haunted the composer at this time as in his song cycle Harawi of 1945. There are twelve solo voices and they must make a wide variety of percussive noises as well as using a broad palette of other vocal techniques. Again there is a strong sense of disguised eroticism "my bouquet all undone is shining pink shutters".

The CD comes with full and clear texts and the essay in French and English with lavish colour photographs. The booklet is tucked inside the neat cardboard casing as is becoming the norm. As for the performances, you are left in no doubt that Marcus Creed extracts from the singers especially, every necessary nuance that each moment of the Cinq Rechant requires. Despite that, whether it's as great a work as many suppose is to my mind still open to question.

Gary Higginson

Music Web International

Michala Petri, recorder
Mahan Esfahani, harpsichord
UK DK
Great 10/10/10 review on UK-DK in Klassik Heute
Klassik Heute Magazine
29 November 2010
Was für eine schöne Idee, dänische und britische Werke des 20. und 21. Jahrhunderts für Blockflöte und Cembalo miteinander zu kombinieren!
Seit einiger Zeit konzertieren die dänische Blockflötenvirtuosin Michala Petri und der in London lebende, persische Cembalist Mahan Esfahani zusammen als Duo. Ihre Debüt-Veröffentlichung als Ensemble mit Corelli-Sonaten fand sogleich größte Beachtung und einmütigen Beifall in der Fachwelt. Für beide Musiker war und ist die Zeitgenössische Musik ein essentieller Bestandteil ihres Repertoires. Im Laufe ihrer bereits über fünf Jahrzehnte währenden Musikerkarriere ist Michala Petri vielen bedeutenden Komponisten begegnet und konnte viele von ihnen für ihr Instrument begeistern. Eine enge Zusammenarbeit und persönliche Freundschaft verband sie auch mit zwei großen dänischen Komponisten der Gegenwart: Vagn Holmboe und Axel Borup-Jørgensen, dessen komplette Blockflötenmusik sie kürzlich ebenso auf dem Label OUR Recordings veröffentlicht hat.

Stilistisch präsentiert sich die vorliegende Einspielung äußerst vielseitig. Der große britische Komponist Sir Malcolm Arnold schrieb einige Werke eigens für Michala Petri. Die hier eingespielte Sonatine aus dem Jahr 1962 jedoch entstand noch bevor sich beide kennengelernt hatten. Ursprünglich für Blockflöte und Klavier gedacht, präsentieren Petri und Esfahani das Stück in einer vom Komponisten ausdrücklich angeregten und gutgeheißenen Version für Blockflöte und Cembalo, die ihren eigenen klanglichen Reiz entfaltet. Als ganz zauberhaftes kleines musikalisches Juwel entpuppt sich Henning Christiansens It is Spring. Der Komponist, ein Freund der Familie, schrieb diese humorvolle Frühlingsmusik mit kapriziösen Appoggiaturen im Jahr 1970. Gordon Jacob komponierte schon früh auf Anregung des englischen Blockflöten-Enthusiasten Carl Dolmetsch für die Blockflöte. Seine bekannte Suite zählt inzwischen zu den meistgespielten Klassikern des Blockflötenrepertoires. Ein Jahr vor seinem Tod schrieb er – 88-jährig – eigens für Michala Petri eine Sonatine und ein Encore, die hier zu hören sind, Musik von herrlich lyrischer Kantabilität, die Michala Petri mit ihrer warmen Tongebung zum Blühen bringt. Auch Vagn Holmboe, der große dänische Sinfoniker, schrieb einige Werke für Michala, u.a. ein Konzert, ein Trio für Blockflöte, Cembalo und Violoncello sowie die vorliegende Sonate aus dem Jahr 1980. Dieses Werk setzt die musikalischen Mittel und die Klangwelt des wenige Jahre zuvor entstandenen Trios fort und integriert auf betörend natürliche Weise auch besondere Effekte wie etwa das gleichzeitige Singen und Spielen, ein wunderbar idiomatisches und musikantisches Werk! Tourbillon, der Beitrag des jüngsten Komponisten der CD, des 1986 geborenen britischen Shooting Stars Daniel Kidane, ist eigens für Michala und Mahans CD entstanden, ein teils verstörend monomanisches, um sich selbst kreisendes, teils fragmentarisches Werk von hohem virtuosem Anspruch, aber auch mit durchaus lyrischen Momenten. Zwar hat Kidanes berühmter Landsmann Benjamin Britten ursprünglich kein Werk für die Duobesetzung komponiert (obwohl ihn der bereits eingangs erwähnte Carl Dolmetsch mehrfach darum gebeten hatte), Michala und Mahans Idee aber, Brittens 1955 während eines Skiurlaubs in den Schweizer Bergen entstandenes kleines Blockflötentrio Alpine Suite für Blockflöte und Cembalo einzurichten, ist überaus gelungen. Den dänischen Gegenpart zu Kidanes Tourbillon stellt Axel Borup-Jørgensens überaus anspruchsvolle Fantasia aus dem Jahr 1988 dar, eine Komposition von ureigener klanglich-musikalischer Ästhetik, deren Schönheit sich dem Hörer erst ganz allmählich erschließt. Gordon Jacobs Encore for Michala beschließt das Programm rührend und versöhnlich.
Petri und Esfahani ergänzen einander musikalisch auf das Schönste. Tonmeister Preben Iwan gab dem Duo ein auch klanglich perfektes Ambiente, die informativen Booklettexte von Joshua Cheek und das geschmackvolle Artwork lassen keine Wünsche offen.
Eine fabelhafte Produktion, die ebenso vergnüglich wie mit Gewinn zu hören ist. Auf eine Fortsetzung darf man gespannt sein!

Heinz Braun
(25.05.2015)

Wertung 10 / 10 / 10

Klassik Heute Magazine

Marcus Creed, Conductor
L'amour et la foi
Vocal Music by Olivier Messiaen (1908 - 1992)
New interesting review on "L´amour et la Foi" in Fanfare
Fanfare Magazine
25 November 2010
 MESSIAEN Trois petites liturgies de la Présence divine1. O sacrum convivium. Cinq Rechants    Marcus Creed, cond; 1Marianna Shirinyan (pn); 1Thomas Block (ondes Martenot); Danish Natl Vocal Ens; Danish Natl Concert Ch; Danish Natl CO    OUR RECORDINGS 6220612 (59:03  original languages only)

This disc of choral music by Olivier Messiaen only include the texts of these pieces in French and Latin, the originals used by the composer. Well, thankfully music is an international language.
The first of the Trois petites liturgies de la Présence divine starts in such a way that it sounds as if it were the middle of the piece, not the opening. The choral writing focuses on the sopranos and is accompanied by a small body of strings and piano, both of which play discretely from each other. In fact, the sparseness of the writing is unusual in any sense for liturgical vocal music. So too the use of the ondes Martenot, a keyboard version of the Theremin. Messiaen himself called this trilogy "color music," referring to the fact that he saw colors when composing. I'd say that it falls somewhere stylistically between his orchestral and piano music of the same period (1945). It is indeed colorful and fascinating music, but to my ears not moving in either a religious or an emotional way. This does not make it bad music, just objective, which to a certain degree is better. Too often, music written to religious texts can try too hard to be "mystical," becoming soft or mawkish in the process. Messiaen avoids this here. I particularly liked the second piece, "Sequence du Verbe, cantique divin," for its tremendous energy and relatively attractive melodic construction. This is a piece that could easily become a staple in church services of high mass, were those churches amenable to the use of modern music. It almost sounds like a more modern, wilder version of Catulli Carmina. I was, however, disappointed by the way he wrote for the ondes Martenot, producing nothing more than swoops of sound. Well, heck, Olivier, any amateur can do that! I would have thought you'd have written something challenging for the instrument. Apparently, France didn't have an ondes Martenot player on the same high level as Theremin master Clara Rockmore. The third piece, "Psalmodie de l'ubiquité par Amour," uses a sort of forwards-backwards motion in the rhythm that resembles part of the Turingalîla Symphony. It is also longer than the first two pieces combined (by 25 seconds, but still, longer). Part of the music's charm, but also a weakness, is its episodic nature. You almost feel as if the music is coming to a close in places, but it's just switching gears. If you're not too hung up on form, however, you'll find yourself enjoying it tremendously.
O sacrum convivium, one of Messiaen's earliest works, is more conventional in construction and set to an old, pre-existing Latin text. Now, this music is lovely and atmospheric in the best tradition of liturgical music. Except for a certain amount of altered chord positions and unusual harmonic solutions, it could easily be performed at many Christian church services without upsetting the faithful.
More interesting, however, are the Cinq Rechants. This, the liner notes tell us, "is the last part of Messiaen's great Tristan trilogy, which was introduced in 1945 with the song cycle Harawi and followed two years later by the monumental Turingalîla Symphony." This is really strange, "out there" music, although I disagree with annotator Christian Hildebrandt's claim that this love drama of "tabooed infidelity and most unselfish love can be interpreted as symbols of Messiaen's own life crisis and love drama." Writers are forever trying to connect works of art to their creators' personal problems, never quite realizing that a creator creates to get away from his or her problems, not to mirror or immortalize them in words or music. That being said, there is no question that this is a really inspired work, performed by a cappella chorus of 12 voices. Sometimes, as in "Ma première fois terre," they are reduced to a whisper; in other places, they shout out their lines. The third piece of the five, "Ma robe d'amour," sounds the most mystical to me; but once again, perhaps particularly in a "Tristan piece," I question the use of the word "liturgical" to describe this music. The text, we are told, is a combination of French and a bizarre Sanskrit-like language that Messiaen invented. Regardless, it's an utterly fascinating piece, full of strange and strong contrasts of mood and style from start to finish. Several parts of the last piece, "Mayorna kalimolimo," sound like precursors to Meredith Monk's work.
Marcus Creed and his forces, choral and orchestral, really tear into this music with a passion and commitment that sweep the listener up in their energy. What a tremendous disc this is! And what great, forward sound! Highly recommended. Lynn René Bayley




Fanfare Magazine

Marcus Creed, Conductor
L'amour et la foi
Vocal Music by Olivier Messiaen (1908 - 1992)
Great 10/10/10 review on Messiean en Klassik Heute
Klassik Heute Magazine
23 November 2010
L'amour et la foi
Vokalmusik von Olivier Messiaen


Aufgrund ihres hohen technischen und musikalischen Anspruches ist Olivier Messiaens Chormusik im gegenwärtigen Konzertleben leider viel zu wenig präsent. Ihr gerecht zu werden, gelingt nur Spitzenchören. Dazu kann man getrost die beiden Vokalensembles zählen, die sich für die vorliegende Aufnahme zusammengeschlossen haben: Das Nationale dänische Vokalensemble sowie der Nationale dänische Konzertchor. Unter Leitung des erfahrenen Chordirigenten Marcus Creed, der seit 2014 auch als Leiter des erstgenannten Chores fungiert, entfalten die Sängerinnen und Sänger einen für Messiaens Werke essentiellen, ebenso homogenen wie transparenten Klang. Ebenso überzeugen die großartigen Chorsolisten.

Die Aufnahme vereint neben dem zentralen Chorwerk Messiaens, den Cinq Rechants für 12 Solostimmen aus dem Jahr 1948 und Messiaens bekanntem frühen O sacrum convivium! auch die Trois petites liturgies de la Présence divine in ihrer ursprünglichen Fassung für 18 Sopranstimmen, 16 Solostreicher, Klavier, Ondes Martenot, Celesta, Vibraphon und Schlagwerk. Dieses rund halbstündige Triptychon besticht durch den großen Farbenreichtum der Partitur, die für Messiaen so charakteristische Verwendung verschiedener Vogelstimmen, Anklänge an balinesische Gamelan-Musik und seine zuweilen geradezu ekstatische Klangwelt. Die Cinq Rechants – als letzter Teil von Messiaens Tristan-Trilogie entstanden, zu der auch sein Liederzyklus Harawi sowie die berühmte Trangalîla-Symphonie zählen – beeindrucken wiederum durch ihre spezifische Klangwelt mit mystischen Unisoni, Sprechpassagen und rhythmischer Kraft.
Die exzellente Tontechnik tut ein Übriges, um die außerordentlichen Qualitäten der Sänger hervorzuheben. Die Booklettexte sind von gewohnt hohem Informationsgehalt..

Heinz Braun
(25.05.2015)

Wertung: 10 / 10 / 10
Klassik Heute Magazine
  OUR Recordings
Esromgade 15, opg.1 3.floor, room 1315
2200 Copenhagen N
Denmark
Tel: +45 4015 05 77
E-mail: hannibal@michalapetri.com
QUICK LINKS
NEWS
RELEASES
PROJECTS
COLLABORATORS
CONCERT SCHEDULE
REVIEWS
GALLERIES
  PROFILE

CONTACT

MICHALA PETRI'S WEBSITE
LARS HANNIBAL'S WEBSITE

 

 
   

Home | Contact | Copyright OUR Recordings 2002 - 2020. All rights reserved. | Michala Petri's Official Website | Lars Hannibal's Official Website