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currently showing records for:
Michala Petri, recorder
Carolin Widmann, violin
Mozart Flute Quartets
German Magazine Klassik Heute review on Mozart! 10 out of 10
Klassik Heute Magazine
02 December 2014
Mozart auf der Blockflöte? Sicher werden einige Aufführungspraxis-Fundamentalisten und Skeptiker schon die Idee allein verwerflich finden. Trotz alledem – Michala Petris Konzept einer Neuaufnahme der Flötenquartette Mozarts auf der Blockflöte ist aufgegangen. Ihre Argumente sind durchaus stichhaltig. Zum einen liegt der weiche, runde Klang einer Blockflöte dem der (hölzernen) Traversflöte, für die Mozart seine Quartette ja konzipiert hatte, näher als der silbrig brillante Ton einer modernen Querflöte; zum anderen darf man wohl getrost der Fragestellung nach der Legitimität einer Realisierung der Quartette des Booklet-Autors Claus Johansen folgen, der Mozart (selbstredend hypothetisch) antworten lässt: „Wie hoch ist das Honorar"?

Mich jedenfalls überzeugt Michala Petris Einspielung. Mehr noch, durch den ungewohnten Klang der Blockflöte hört man die Quartette gleichsam wie aus einer neuen Perspektive. Die spieltechnischen Entwicklungen der letzten Jahre und instrumentenspezifischen Neuerungen der Blockflöte sind an Michala Petri nicht spurlos vorübergegangen. Im Vergleich zu früher ist Petris Spiel klanglich flexibler geworden und hat an dynamischer Bandbreite und Expressivität gewonnen. Mit den drei Streicherinnen gelingt ihr ein perfektes, organisches Zusammenspiel. Kritikpunkte seien nicht verschwiegen: An einigen Stellen scheint mir die Blockflöte intonatorisch etwas zu hoch, und das Thema des A-Dur-Quartetts (dem Petri mit einer Sopranblockflöte Frische und Brillanz verleiht) wirkt – im Gegensatz zum Rest der Aufnahme – etwas undifferenziert und plan in Bezug auf Phrasierung und Artikulation. Trotz dieser kleinen Einschränkung eine überzeugende, absolut gültige Aufnahme, die so manchen Mozart-Freund positiv überraschen wird.

Heinz Braun (26.09.2008)
Künstlerische Qualität:
  9
Bewertungsskala: 1-10
Klangqualität:
  10

Gesamteindruck:
10

Klassik Heute Magazine

Michala Petri and Elisabet Selin
Axel Borup-Jørgensen (1924-2012)
Recorder music by Axel Borup-Jørgensen
Review in IRR on Recordermusic by Axel Borup-Jørgenssen
IRR Magazine
19 October 2014
The harpsichord also features on Recorder Music by Axel Borup-Jørgensen alongside percussion and the twin recorders of Elisabet Selin and Michala Petri, a similary new life afforded an ancient instrument previously exemplified in this column by Petri´s work with Palle Mikkelborgs and the Burgess disc covered in the October issue. The works are various combinations of these instruments, their structural rigour and striking timbral contrasts giving the programme a genuinely other-worldly quality, as if of a fascinating tradition imported wholesale from some parallel universe. However, I feel justified in delivering a reprimand for a fault I Thought was long extinct, which is failing to get native speakers to vet your booklet note translations, being told, for example, that one of the composer's early artistic skills was as " an impressive drawer" cue "part of the furniture" jokes) devalues the whole process of supporting music with text. Roger Thomas, International Record Review (IRR) January 2014.
IRR Magazine

Palle Mikkelborg
Going To Pieces - Without Falling Apart
Great Review in Music Web International on "Going to Pieces-Without falling Apart"!
Music Web International
30 September 2014
Music Web International:

Palle MIKKELBORG (b.1941)
Going to Pieces • Without Falling Apart - Concerto for harp, recorder and string orchestra (2004 rev 2012) [55:10]
Afterthoughts (2012) ¹
Helen Davies (harp): Michala Petri (recorder)
South Jutland Symphony Orchestra/Henrik Vagn Christensen
Palle Mikkelborg (trumpet); orchestrations by Thomas Li ¹
rec. December 2012, Alsion Concert Hall, Sønderborg, Denmark; Afterthoughts recorded and mixed by Thomas Li in January 2013 in MyRoomStudio, Østerbro
OUR RECORDINGS 6.220607 [55:10]
Palle Mikkelborg was winning awards as long ago as 1968, when he took the Danish Jazz Musician of the Year prize. He remains a trumpeter of great thoughtfulness, lyricism and inimitable tone. The concerto Going to Pieces • Without Falling Apart - the title derives from a book by Mark Epstein, and I've faithfully copied the disc's punctuation - was composed back in 2004 for harp, violin and string orchestra but was revised for harp and recorder in 2012, and it's in the revised version that we hear this 12-movement concerto.
 
Much like his trumpet playing, which helped inaugurate a new sound in Scandinavian brass playing, the music is suffused in vaporous beauty. Lightly but precisely orchestrated, each of the movements bears an evocative title and whilst these need not be taken wholly literally they are useful indices of the composer's imaginatively compressed ideas and feelings; some are bardic, some lovely and dancingly patterned, crisply alive, with thrumming harp and piping alert recorder. Others, still, enshrine deft colour and interplay, delicacy or sonorously warmly textured romantic breadth. Some of the music, too, is slightly filmic, other sections waltz-like animated by the refined orchestral and soloistic palette which veers against any kind of bombast. And yet section 8, A spiritual carousel, bursts forth into a dashing tango. There's one moment in movement 11 where overdubbed voices play their part in the brisk narrative. It's appropriate that the concerto - it's a novel kind of concerto - should end with a waltz since the music often looks to the condition of dance whilst co-opting reverie and nostalgia as co-conspirators.
 
You will need to be attuned to Mikkelborg's sound-world to appreciate this piece. Those unsympathetic to it might think it pallid or too inclined to a certain amorphous quality. But if you like it - and it's obvious from the foregoing that I did, and do - you will surely admire its deft detailing, its beautiful solo writing, and the many moments offered for contrast of mood and rhythm. For all that it remains unsplintered, a reverie that summons up time and place - some African, some Chinese, some Irish - without becoming frustratingly modish or unfocused. In all respects the two well-known soloists acquit themselves with distinction, evoking textures and moods with ceaseless refinement.
 
To cap this there is a piece called Afterthoughts in which Mikkelborg distils the essence of his concerto into a trumpet-and-orchestral fabric, orchestrated by Thomas Li. Fundamentally lyrical, it's a pleasure - beyond even hearing the thematic connections - to hear again that fabled trumpet tone. Outstanding sonics and production values ensure a winning disc.
 
Jonathan Woolf  November 2013

Evocative of textures and moods with ceaseless refinement … fundamentally lyrical … a pleasure … a winning disc 

Music Web International

Michala Petri and Elisabet Selin
Axel Borup-Jørgensen (1924-2012)
Recorder music by Axel Borup-Jørgensen
Enthusiastic US review on "Recordermusic by Axel Borup-Jørgensen"
Grego Applegate Edwards
04 September 2014
Up until now when I thought of recorders, I thought of the baroque and early music periods and the sound one hears in such contexts. It never occurred to me that the high modern arena would utilize the family of instruments and I cannot recall having heard such a thing.
But all that is in the past now that I have immersed myself in Axel Borup-Jorgensen's CD Recorder Music (OUR Recordings 8.226910). We are treated to eight compositions for various-sized recorders--alone, with harpsichord or with percussion. No less than seven of these works are enjoying their world premier recordings on this disk.

The recorder performances are in the hands of Michala Petri and Elisabet Selin, and they are impressive exponents indeed. Ingrid Myrhoj appears on harpsichord for two pieces; Gert Mortensen plays the multiple percussion instrument part on the one work involved. Everyone sounds great but it is the expanded recorder techniques and the clarity, dynamic thrust and elan of their execution that bring it all together.

Alex Borup-Jorgensen (1924-2012) wrote these works between 1975 and 2011. That they were a labor of love seems clear as you listen. The mastering of the recorder parts by Michala Petri and Elizabet Selin were no doubt labors of love as well.

The earlier works feature rapid-fire jumps into and out of various registers; the later works less so. In any case the parts are difficult and superbly played. It's almost uncanny to hear the recorder in an expanded, ultra-modern tonality. Once one gets over the shock the idea that these are fine works that bear repeated hearings sets in. And from that point I was hooked.

This is not just state-of-the-art modern recorder music. It is also a collection of very pleasing high-modern chamber music.

Very much recommended.



Posted by  Grego Applegate Edwards February 3th 2014
Grego Applegate Edwards

Michala Petri, recorder
City Chamber Orchestra of Hong Kong
English Recorder Concertos
Great review on English Recorder Concertos in UK Magazine "Scene"!
Scene Magazine
22 June 2014
From the English magazine "Scene"
Early 20th century orchestral and chamber music underwent a transformative process that saw new composing methods emerge to challenge the orthodox strictures of classical masters. But at the same time the monolithic edifi ce of the Western instrumental tradition was starting to splinter, a cultural countercurrent formed. Spurred on by advances in music history, scholarship and recording technology, an effort to revive the sounds of medieval and renaissance Europe was also underway, offering up a curious aural contrast to serialism and atonality. One of the instruments to directly benefi t from this renewed interest was the recorder, which - at one time – was known as the "English fl ute". Although use of the instrument had fallen out of favor during the classical and romantic musical periods, its smoky yet remarkably robust melodic sound found fans in British composers Richard Harvey, Sir Malcolm Arnold and Gordon Jacob, three men whose works comprise the program of this recent CD release. Performed by incomparable instrumental soloist Michala Petri and the City Chamber Orchestra of Hong Kong under the direction of conductor Jean Thorel, these varied pieces demonstrate the range of once-maligned woodwind. From the dramatic opening of Harvey's Concerto Incanto through the pastoral meanderings of Jacob's Suite for Recorder and Strings, this is the music of European myth and history. Recommended.
– Chris Morgan
Scene Magazine

Kim Sjøgren, violin
Lars Hannibal, guitar
Lalo : Symphonie espagnole
for violin and guitar
Lalo recording of the month July 2008 in Music Web International
Music Web International
03 June 2014
These two well known works composed originally for Pablo de Sarasate are given wonderfully refreshing new clothes in these tasteful and thoroughly idiomatic arrangements by guitarist Lars Hannibal. This is one of the more delightful surprises to cross the desk in some weeks, and it  has received the unusual honor of repeated plays in a household that is near capacity with unheard compact discs.
 
The wonderful delight here is just how well these arrangements work, and how well the orchestral accompaniments suit the guitar. Couple this with the splendidly reverberant acoustics of the recording venues, and the careful balance that is achieved by the recording engineers and you get a completely winsome combination both musically and sonically.
 
Mr. Sjøgren keeps sheer virtuosity at bay with his abundant good taste, never letting us know that this music actually takes some work to pull off. His tone is warm and with the exception of a rare miss in intonation in the very highest registers, this is playing of immaculate accomplishment and panache. Mr. Hannibal's guitar tone is full and rich and the two work very well together as an ensemble.
 
The music itself is pure poetry, and I was thrilled to discover the Fantasie Norvégienne, a work heretofore unknown to me. It is full of sweeping melodies and lush harmonies, replete with crystalline beauty and thankfully devoid of romantic gush. This work alone is worth the price of admission.
 
Packaging and presentation are long on pretty pictures and short on content. One might have wanted a bit more meat in the program notes, but no matter. The music and these fine performances speak well for themselves, and more information about the music is but a few keystrokes away in this day and age. This recital would be a fine addition to any collection, a wonderful sojourn off the beaten path.
 
Kevin Sutton

see also review by Jonathan Woolf
 



Music Web International

Michala Petri and Elisabet Selin
Axel Borup-Jørgensen (1924-2012)
Recorder music by Axel Borup-Jørgensen
Great Gramophone review on Recorder Music by Axel-Borup-Jørgensen
Gramophone Magazine
24 March 2014
Gramophone on Recorder Music by Axel Borup-Jørgensen
Gramophone Collector, New Music from Denmark. Richard Whitehouse takes the pulse of Denmark's contemporary music scene through four discs of new writing.
Although Finland has latterly made the running in terms of new music, the Danish scene has long been one of strength in diversity – confirmed by the four discs under consideration.
Only recently has the music of Axel Borup-Jørgensen (1924-2012) enjoyed wider attention. A disc of percussion works (9/14) detonate a figure of sensitivity and refinement, reinforced by this anthology of pieces for and featuring recorder on the enterprising OUR Recordings label co-founded by Michala Petri.
This is also an overview of Borup-Jørgensen's evolution over his final three decades of composing, ranging from the starkly austere interplay between recorder and harpsichord in Fantasia (1975) to a poise and eloquent melodic line in the unaccompanied Pergolato(2011) that was to be his final work. Any thought of sequencing in chronological was rightly outweighed by that of presenting the works to confirm Borup-Jørgensen's ease in his writing for tenor, treble, descant and sopranino instruments. Petri and Elisabet Selin (the composer's daughter) share the honours, with, with Ingrid Myrhøj the virtuoso harpsichordist in the tensile Zwiegespräch (Dialogue,1989) and Gert Mortensen the comparably dedicated percussionist in Periphrasis (1977) which opens the disc in combative fashion. Gramophone October 2014
Gramophone Magazine

Michala Petri and Elisabet Selin
Axel Borup-Jørgensen (1924-2012)
Recorder music by Axel Borup-Jørgensen
Great review in leading German Magazine for Chambermusic "Ensemble" on Recorder music by Axel Borup-Jørgensen!
Ensemble
24 March 2014
Review on Recorder music by Axel Borup-Jørgensen in German Magazine "Ensemble"!
Vogelkonzert
Michala Petri zwitschert und trillert fast vier minuten lang (in Track 5: "Vogelkonzert") auf einem Diskant-Blockflötchen wie ein Vögelchen: Welches Instrument Könnte das besser? Der Dane Axel Borup-Jørgensen, in Sweden aufgewachsen, in Kopenhagen ausgebildet, in Darmstadt mit Neuer Musik befasst, hat für die Meisterin und ihre einzige Privatschülerin, seine Tochter Elisabet Selin, Blockflötenstücke geschrieben, von denen acht auf dieser CD die ganze Breite seiner Kompositionskunst widerspiegeln: Die beiden spielen abwechselnd fünf Solowerke fûr unterschiedliche Blockflöten, dazu eines mit – knallig lautern! – Schlagwerk und zwei mit cembalo begleitet. In allen schmeichelt sich in tiefer Lage der warme, in höchster auch kreischen, zirpen und piepsen den Blockflötenton ins Ohr – gebändigte und losgelassene Natur! Maj 2014,- Diether Steppuhn
Ensemble

Kim Sjøgren, violin
Lars Hannibal, guitar
Lalo : Symphonie espagnole
for violin and guitar
Lalo CD of the mont in Music Web International
Music Web International
24 March 2014

CD REVIEW
RECORDING OF THE MONTH in Music Web International
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Edouard LALO (1823-1892)
Symphonie Espagnole, Op. 21 (1874) [34:07]
Fantasie Norvégienne, (1878) [14:26]
(both works arr. violin and guitar by Lars Hannibal)
Kim Sjøgren, (violin); Lars Hannibal, (guitar)
rec. May 1992, monastery La Cartuja de la Sierra de Cazalla, Spain (Symphonie); August 1992, chapel of HM Queen Margrethe II's summer residence, Fredensborg Castle.
OUR RECORDINGS 8.226903 [48:33] 
 

These two well known works composed originally for Pablo de Sarasate are given wonderfully refreshing new clothes in these tasteful and thoroughly idiomatic arrangements by guitarist Lars Hannibal. This is one of the more delightful surprises to cross the desk in some weeks, and it  has received the unusual honor of repeated plays in a household that is near capacity with unheard compact discs.
 
The wonderful delight here is just how well these arrangements work, and how well the orchestral accompaniments suit the guitar. Couple this with the splendidly reverberant acoustics of the recording venues, and the careful balance that is achieved by the recording engineers and you get a completely winsome combination both musically and sonically.
 
Mr. Sjøgren keeps sheer virtuosity at bay with his abundant good taste, never letting us know that this music actually takes some work to pull off. His tone is warm and with the exception of a rare miss in intonation in the very highest registers, this is playing of immaculate accomplishment and panache. Mr. Hannibal's guitar tone is full and rich and the two work very well together as an ensemble.
 
The music itself is pure poetry, and I was thrilled to discover the Fantasie Norvégienne, a work heretofore unknown to me. It is full of sweeping melodies and lush harmonies, replete with crystalline beauty and thankfully devoid of romantic gush. This work alone is worth the price of admission.
 
Packaging and presentation are long on pretty pictures and short on content. One might have wanted a bit more meat in the program notes, but no matter. The music and these fine performances speak well for themselves, and more information about the music is but a few keystrokes away in this day and age. This recital would be a fine addition to any collection, a wonderful sojourn off the beaten path.
 
Kevin Sutton

see also review by Jonathan Woolf
 


Music Web International

Michala Petri and Elisabet Selin
Axel Borup-Jørgensen (1924-2012)
Recorder music by Axel Borup-Jørgensen
Gramophone on "The Percussion Universe of Axel Borup-Jørgensen
Gramophone Magazine
24 March 2014

Axel Borup-Jørgensen (1924-2012) will be a name unfamiliar to many though this Danish composer left a substantial body of work and finds meaningful accommodation between mid-20th-century modernism and the aesthetic concerns of an earlier era. This disc of music for and featuring percussion touches on all the relevant bases- not least Solo(1979), where archetypal groupings of metal, skin and wood are drawn into a continuity so that differences in timbre are outweighed by similarities of texture. Much the earliest piece her, Music for Percussion and Viola (1956) yields a rhythmic uniformity its composer was later to eschew, yet the gradual coalescing of opposites in a climatic processional is no less arresting for it.
The duo percussion medium is represented by La Primavera (1982) the longest and also slowest-burning work, which, despite its fastidious blending of instruments and the visceral exchanges towards its close, is likely as much visual as aural in appeal. Not so Periphrasis (1997), in which the interplay with recorder is made meaningful through the separating of un-tuned and tuned percussion that ensures an unbroken arc of expressive intensity through to the close. An outcome no less audiable in Winter Music (1984), except the brass quintet adds Varése-like plangency to music whose ominous import is pointedly not made explicit.
Recorded with startling clarity and informatively annotated, this release is another triumph for Gert Mortensen and the formidable roster of musicians with whom he has collaborated on this project-so resulting in memorable listening experience. Richard Whitehouse, Gramophone September 2014
Gramophone Magazine

Michala Petri and Elisabet Selin
Axel Borup-Jørgensen (1924-2012)
Recorder music by Axel Borup-Jørgensen
Fantastic review in US Magazine Fanfare on Recorder Music by Axel Borup-Jørgensen
Fanfare Magazine
13 March 2014
Any idea that a disc of recorder music is going to be gentle and filled with happy pipings is instantly contradicted by the overtly Modernist drum poundings that open Periphrasis (1977, revised 1993–94), which arrive like so much thunder. It comes as no surprise to learn that Axel Borup-Jørgensen (1924–2012) attended Darmstadt, first in 1959, returning in 1962. It is scored for recorder and percussion; the percussion writing is virtuosic (as is the performance in this recording); the instruments interact with and react to the recorder's likewise virtuosic statements. If the recorder has a chalumeau register, it is this which is on display in the later parts of the piece (around seven and a half minutes in). Michala Petri, surely the world's best-known (and loved) recorder player, demonstrates not only virtuosity but a true understanding of idiom.
Elisabet Selin, a name new to me and in fact the composer's daughter (and student of Michala Petri), is clearly of an equivalent level of virtuosity and musicality. Written for solo tenor recorder, Nachtstück (1967) is an intriguing meditation. It comes as no surprise to encounter multiphonics in this music; the surprise is that they are so convincingly rendered. There are even attempts at counterpoint. The result is remarkable, and caught in a vivid recording.
The shrill monodic adventures of the solo sopranino recorder (Petri) shape Architraves (1977). The reference to birds is visceral, and quite unlike Messiaen—a sort of mid-stage between birdsong proper and what Messiaen might have done with it perhaps, or a first-step transmogrification. Whatever, it remains on the tightrope between delightful and demanding. Our avian friends return in Birds Concert (1985), where Petri is once more at her most charming.
The arrival of the harpsichord is like listening to shards of glass: This particular harpsichord is a very forceful instrument, and is recorded viscerally in Zwiegerspräch of 1988–89. Here it is the sopranino recorder of Selin that complements the harpsichord with its shrillness. At only just over five minutes, the work feels too short (although it is relentless).The Fantasia of 1975 (revised 1986–88) for sopranino recorder (Selin) and harpsichord is the longest piece on the disc. The stamina of the players is truly remarkable, perhaps mostly in terms of sheer concentration. The intensity does not flag for a second. The solo recorder flights are remarkable in their inspiration; the harpsichord's antics are hardly less impressive. The ending is cheeky and teasing.
Written in 2011, Pergolato is for treble recorder, a five-minute lament delivered eloquently by Petri. The Notenbüchlein (as it is given on the back cover; in the notes it is Notenbüchlein für Anna Elisabeth) of 1977–78 is an exploratory piece whose solo melody (Selin), while not quite as melancholic as Pergolato, nevertheless speaks of questing, of searching.
A remarkable disc, stunningly performed and well recorded. Colin Clarke, Fanfare May/June issue 2014

Fanfare Magazine

Michala Petri and Elisabet Selin
Axel Borup-Jørgensen (1924-2012)
Recorder music by Axel Borup-Jørgensen
Overwhelming review on Recorder Music by Axel Borup-Jørgensen in Klassik Heute
Klassik Heute Magazine
06 March 2014
Klassik Heute
Recorder Music by Axel Borup-Jørgensen
Wertung: 10 / 10 / 10


Der dänische Komponist und Pianist Axel Borup-Jørgensen (1924-2012) war einer der großen, stillen Individualisten Skandinaviens im 20. Jahrhundert. In Dänemark geboren und in Schweden aufgewachsen, erhielt er seine Ausbildung an der Königlichen Musikakademie in Kopenhagen. Obwohl als Komponist weitgehend Autodidakt, zählte er 1959 zu den ersten dänischen Komponisten, die die Darmstädter Ferienkurse für Neue Musik besuchten. Wolfgang Fortner ermutigte den jungen Musiker, den eingeschlagenen Weg fortzusetzen. Ohne Zweifel übte die Avantgarde der Sechzigerjahre einen starken Einfluss auf Borup-Jørgensens Klangwelt aus, jedoch komponierte er nie streng seriell, sondern ließ sich in seiner kompositorischen Arbeit stets von Intuition und seinem außerordentlichen Klangsinn leiten. Borup-Jørgensens handschriftliche Partituren von geradezu kalligraphischer Qualität und Schönheit verraten den ausgesprochenen Klang-Tüftler und Magier der Farben. Seine Musik kennt feinste melodische Verästelungen ebenso wie zupackende, dramatische Eruptionen, so etwa in seinem orchestralen Hauptwerk Marin (1970) oder Musica autumnalis (1977). Der weit überwiegende Teil seines Schaffens ist der Kammermusik gewidmet. Hier genoss er die Freiheit und Inspiration, eng mit seinen Interpreten zusammenzuarbeiten und neue klangliche Möglichkeiten der Instrumente erforschen und erproben zu können.
Dass die Blockflöte in Axel Borup-Jørgensens Werkliste eine nicht unwesentliche Stellung einnimmt, verdanken wir seiner Begegnung (und lebenslangen Freundschaft) mit der dänischen Blockflötenvirtuosin Michala Petri und seiner Tochter Elisabet Selin, für die er zahlreiche anspruchsvolle Kompositionen geschaffen hat.
Diese ausgesprochen sorgfältig edierte, musikalisch, klanglich und nicht zuletzt auch optisch exzellente Produktion seiner (fast kompletten) Blockflötenmusik beleuchtet einen Zeitraum von fast dreißig Jahren – von seinen ersten Versuchen mit dem Instrument Mitte der Siebziger Jahre bis hin zu Pergolato, der etwas mehr als ein Jahr vor seinem Tod entstandenen letzten Komposition des damals 86-Jährigen.
Authentischer und kompetenter könnte die Wiedergabe nicht sein: Eben jene Spielerinnen, die sein Interesse am Instrument geweckt hatten und mit denen er in der Folge auf das Engste zusammenarbeitete, sind auf der Aufnahme zu hören. Borup-Jørgensens auffallende Affinität zu den hohen Instrumenten der Blockflötenfamilie und ihrem der Frauenstimme ähnlichen wie auch dem Vogelgesang verwandten Klang macht es nicht leicht, die Werke dramaturgisch so geschickt und abwechslungsreich anzuordnen wie man es etwa von einem Konzertprogramm erwarten würde. Die CD ist offensichtlich auch eher „enzyklopädisch" gedacht – als Referenzsammlung seiner Blockflötenwerke.
Periphrasis (1977 ursprünglich für Flöte und Schlagzeug komponiert und in den Neunziger Jahren für Blockflöte adaptiert) firmiert als fulminanter Auftakt. Im dialogischen Spiel fungiert die Blockflöte häufig als ruhender Pol im faszinierenden Klangfarbenkaleidoskop des Perkussionsappartes, der subtil mit den vier wechselnden Blockflöten (von Sopranino bis Tenor) interagiert. In welchem Maße sich Borup-Jørgensen in die Idiomatik des Instrumentes eingehört und –gedacht hat, zeigt sich vor allem im für seine Tochter komponierten Tenorflöten-Monolog Nachtstück aus dem Jahr 1987. Hier schafft er einen eigenen Kosmos von äußerster Expressivität der feinen Zwischentöne, der sich aus der Stille ganz allmählich geräuschhaft vortastend zu einer dramatischen Klimax mit blockhaften Akkordklängen steigert, um letztlich zu verstummen. Für mich vielleicht die unmittelbarste und auch formal geschlossenste Komposition der CD. Elisabet Selin realisiert hier nicht allein akribisch die detaillierten Farbnuancierungen der Partitur, sondern gestaltet den Spannungsbogen so zwingend souverän und von einer dramatischen Intensität wie man sie selten hört. Der einzigartige, unverwechselbare Ton Michala Petris prägt Architraves, ein hypnotisches  Solostück für Sopraninoblockflöte. Das über ein Jahrzehnt später entstandene konzise Zwiegespräch knüpft klanglich daran an, erweitert aber die Besetzung mit dem silbrig-hellen Klang des Cembalos und kontrastiert die hohe Blockflöte mit sonoren, koloristischen Clustertexturen. Mitte der Neunziger Jahre entstand Birds Concert für Sopranblockflöte, das u.a. mit verschiedenen Trillern, Vorschlagsnoten und Flatterzungenspiel eine (jahrhundertelange) Tradition von Vogelmusik für das Instrument fortführt. Die 1975 komponierte Fantasia war das erste Werk Borup-Jørgensens, in dem er sich professionell mit der Blockflöte befasste und Ausgangspunkt einer kreativen Entdeckungsreise, die bis zum Ende seines Schaffens anhalten sollte. Wie Zwiegespräch für die Kombination von Sopranino und Cembalo konzipiert (und wie im ersten Falle von Elisabet Selin und ihrer Mutter Ingrid Myrhøj interpretiert), erzeugt das Stück von Beginn an eine gänzlich eigene, mysteriös-gespenstische Klangwelt von großer atmosphärischer Dichte. Der Kreis von Borup-Jørgensens kompositorischem Œuvre schließt sich in Pergolato mit dem weichen, milden Klang der Altblockflöte. Das für seine früheren Stücke so charakteristische hypnotisierende Kreisen, die dramatischen, raumgreifenden Intervallsprünge und abrupten Registerwechsel weichen in Pergolato meditativer Ruhe und lyrischer Melancholie. Wie in einer posthumen Verneigung vor dem großen Künstler und Freund strahlt Michala Petris Spiel hier besondere Würde und Demut aus. Das die CD beschließende Notenbüchlein für Sopranblockflöte solo (1977-79 für seine Tochter Elisabet Selin entstanden und hier auch von ihr gespielt) fasst in Form einer Suite von Miniaturstücken noch einmal kurios die charakteristischen Merkmale von Borup-Jørgensens Blockflötenmusik zusammen. 
OUR Recordings hat mit dieser Produktion (wieder einmal) Maßstäbe gesetzt. Gewiss, Borup-Jørgensens Musik ist keine „leichte Kost", aber sie ist ein gewichtiger Meilenstein der Blockflötenmusik des 20. Jahrhunderts – eine Musik von höchster Individualität und Geradlinigkeit, der man sich nur schwer entziehen kann.

Heinz Braun
(04.03.2014)

Klassik Heute Magazine

Michala Petri and Lars Hannibal
Virtuoso Baroque
Wonderful review in UK Magazine for OLD Music -The Consort -on Virtuoso Baroque
The Consort
06 March 2014
The Consort, UK

The recorder has an ancient and honourable history. Bone flutes survive from Neanderthal context, and a wonderfully preserved set of six flutes from Jiahu in China, some 9.000 years old and made from hollowed wing-bones of the red-crowned crane – each with seven holes carefully tuned to a scale remarkably similar to our Western 8-nate scale – might almost be considered the earliest prototype of the recorder consort.
This recording celebrates Michala's twenty-year collaboration with the distinguished archlutenist Lars Hannibal,- a remarkable achievement. The CD begins with Vitali's Chaconne in G minor, originally composed for the violin, and first brought to the attention of the modern world by the virtuoso violinist and friend of Mendelsohn, Ferdinand David. In his hands the piece was transformed into so improbably romantic a work that its authenticity was in doubt until recently, but it appearance in a Dresden manuscript dating from before 1730 confirms the the work is by Tomaso Vitali (or Vitalino): his imaginative divisions and sometimes surprising harmonic adventures provide us with a captivating introduction to Michala Petri´s programme.
It continues in more conventional recorder territory, with the Sonata in D minor taken from the set of 12 published by Telemann in Der Getreuer Musikmeister; with its gentle opening Affetuoso and joyful final gigue, Telemann provides plenty of scope for the archlute to contribute creatively, especially in the sonata's quierter moments.
Bach's enchanting flute sonata BWV 1033, originally written in C major for traverse flute, is here transposed to F major, and works delightfully well on the recorder; Petri makes light of the usual problem with bachs woodwind music, in that being himself a keyboard player he tends to forget thatthe flautist has occasionally to breathe. This sonata comes downto us in six early manuscripts, including one from 1731 in the handwriting of Bach's son, Carl Philipp Emanuel who, some scolars believe, may have collaborated in the composition of this work.
This is followed by the Sonata in G major RV 58 from Il Pastor Fido, which comes with its own problems of authorship. For more than 200 years the music was attributed to Antonio Vivaldi, but Il Pastor Fido turns out to have been a elaborate forgery on the part Nicalos Chédeville (1705-82), who wishes to give the greater credibility which the more famous composer would afford, to his own efforts. He needn't have worried, his accomplished pieces delightfully evoke the arcadian world of the Amusements Champétres so beloved of the early 18th – century French aristocracy, and Petri here enters perfectly into their pastoral spirit with her sopranino and tenor recorders.
La Folia was a favourite melody throughout Italy, Spain and Portugal, attracting thew imagination of composers as early as 1500s, and the creativity of Lully, Vivaldi and Bach, among many other masters, but Arcangelo Corelli made the piece his own, and his set of 24 variations on the theme, op 5 no 12, originally written for violin, was appropriated by players of many other instruments; the present version for recorder was published in London 1702.
Guiseppe Tartini's Sonata in G minor, Trillo del Diavolo ("The Devil's trill") the composers most famous work, was suppressed during his lifetime, and even the story behind its composition an attempt by Tartini to capture the music played to him in a dream by Satan himself – was not published until after the composer's death. Although only a shadow of what he said he had heard, Tartini considered this work "indeed the best that ever I wrote",- and Michala Petri's sopranino recorder version is an astonishing tour de force.
With Handel's Sonata in B flat major HWV 377, we return to the recorder's more familiar terrain; although this manuscript, from the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, does not specify instrumentation – and Handel recycled the sonata's three movements in various other directions,- the work lies naturally within the recorder's range, and it has long been embraced by players of the instrument.
This engaging programme explores repertoire far beyond the regions normally inhabited by the baroque recorder, and Michala Petri's fine playing is so sensitively supported by the creative accompaniment of Lars Hannibal that my only regret is that room has not been found on this CD for some solo music for his archlute. Maybe next time? And perhaps, next time a note or two about the players themselves , to go with the excellent information on the music. Margareth Rees, June 2012
The Consort

Kim Sjøgren, violin
Lars Hannibal, guitar
Lalo : Symphonie espagnole
for violin and guitar
Fanfare Review on Lalo
Fanfare Magazine
06 March 2014
Here's a valiant notion carried off with aplomb-singing and soaring against rhythmic point-

…Laolo's snappily inflected lyricism is realized with delicious enjoyment by both artists….

I look forward to hearing from either or both artists again…

Another illustration that it's the music, not the medium – if entrusting the orchestra's part to a guitar seems to be pushing it, less emphatic moments, with the instruments evenly matched, demonstrate that it can succeed triumphantly.

Enthusiastically recommended… Adrian Corleonis
Fanfare Magazine

Kim Sjøgren, violin
Lars Hannibal, guitar
Lalo : Symphonie espagnole
for violin and guitar
MusicWeb Review on Lalo
Music Web International
06 March 2014
Here's one for transcribers. You'll have a copy of the Symphonie Espagnole somewhere or other on your shelves but I doubt very much that you'll have come across Lars Hannibal's arrangement of the work for violin and guitar. Well, here it is, played by the transcriber and his colleague Kim Sjøgren.
 
It goes without saying that it gives the work the character of a chamber piece and that there are numerous moments that, because of the Iberian affinities of the music, sit well for the guitar – the opening for example is immediately arresting. I'm sure Hannibal would hardly claim that the felicity and subtlety of the wind parts have survived entirely intact – but then doubtless he would counter that his transcription serves a different function.  He and Sjøgren are a well established team and they have been captured in the big acoustic of the Monastery La Cartuja de la Sierra de Cazalla – not a new recording by any means as it was taped back in 1992. The sound tends to swell to fill the acoustic quite dramatically.
 
Sjøgren is a big boned and big-hearted player who piles on the expression. He's made a fine recording of the Nielsen Concerto for Chandos. He digs deeply into the string though tonally things aren't as variegated as they might ideally be. Similarly his bowing is inclined to be quite muscular. He seems to enjoy the arrangement - though in the modern manner he largely abjures expressive finger position changes and portamenti. The whole performance is rather enjoyable; in a way it put me in mind of inter-war recitals in which concertos were piano accompanied. There's a certain utility to the thing.
 
Hannibal has also arranged the much less well-known Fantasie Norvégienne. In fact aficionados of the guitarist will know that he's recorded it in a version for sopranino recorder and guitar with his wife Michala Petri ["Kreisler Inspirations" - RCA 74321 75479-2]. This again is an orchestral work that Hannibal has downsized appropriately for guitar and violin. It's not inappropriate really as, unlike the companion work, you're highly unlikely to run into this in concert. Violinists of old generally played it in a piano reduction anyway, so Hannibal's work is well founded here. Once again Sjøgren makes a big sound, explicitly contrasting upper and lower strings in a tonal tussle of wills. Occasionally some of the lower string work is a little hoarse. Otherwise his playing is once again extrovert, with some throbbing vibrato to the fore in the central movement. If you've ever come across recordings of the work they're likely to have been by Thibaud and Ricci.
 
Unusual and surprising fare from Our Recordings.
 
Jonathan Woolf

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classRev/2008/Mar08/Lalo_8226903.htm
Music Web International

Michala Petri, recorder
Anthony Newman, harpsichord
Telemann 4 2
Complete Recorder Sonatas
Review in Daily Classical Review on Telemann for Two
Daily Classical Music
06 March 2014
Handel was only sixteen when he first met Telemann. They remained in touch, and Handel later sent him from London a selection of rare plants. Telemann was godfather to Bach's second son and wrote a fine poem after Johann Sebastian's death. Since then Telemann's reputation has wavered. Here he sounds an occasionally plangent note, but for the most part is content to be playful and skittish. The result is delectable listening. The first sonata from 'The Trusty Music master' starts with the sort of fireworks Telemann could let off almost without thinking.
It is a major pleasure, as it were, when Telemann decides to languish into the minor. His F minor sonata in the same set begins 'Triste', and the mood is maintained throughout the third-movement Andante. This gives Michala Petri, who has demonstrated already a formidable technique in dazzling passagework, the chance to show how expressively she can also play.
I can only think back ruefully to my own recorder-playing days, inspired all those years ago by the comparatively modest performances of the Dolmetsch family.
Telemann remains a little mournful in the first of his 'Music Study' sonatas, even when proceeding at speed. I now began to wonder whether the balance between recorder and Anthony Newman's harpsichord was not tilted too much towards the former. A cello to reinforce the bass line would have been appropriate and helpful.
I can but admire, however, the remarkable variety of tone Michala Petri obtains from her instrument, as also the dynamic range. There is not the slightest hint of monotony.
It is joyous to end with the sheer virtuosity of the final Vivace on the CD, in which Telemann throws down the gauntlet of a fearsome technical challenge. The performance is indeed triumphant.
It is worth adding a word of commendation for the admirable liner notes of Joshua Cheek. For once I felt no need to surround myself with a pile of reference books, and basked happily in the midst of much apposite writing. I agree that 'Ehrenpforte' means 'Triumphal Arch', but in context 'Roll of Honour' might just be preferable. I greatly appreciated the title to his piece: 'A Telemann for All Seasons'. I could not ask more. Robert Anderson February 2014
Daily Classical Music

Michala Petri and Elisabet Selin
Axel Borup-Jørgensen (1924-2012)
Recorder music by Axel Borup-Jørgensen
Great Gapplegate review on Recorder Music by Axel Borup-Jørgensen
Gapplegate
12 February 2014
Gapplegate Classical-Modern Music Review
Modern classical and avant garde concert music of the 20th and 21st centuries forms the primary focus of this blog. It is hoped that through the discussions a picture will emerge of modern music, its heritage, and what it means for us.

Up until now when I thought of recorders, I thought of the baroque and early music periods and the sound one hears in such contexts. It never occurred to me that the high modern arena would utilize the family of instruments and I cannot recall having heard such a thing.
But all that is in the past now that I have immersed myself in Axel Borup-Jorgensen's CD Recorder Music (OUR Recordings 8.226910). We are treated to eight compositions for various-sized recorders--alone, with harpsichord or with percussion. No less than seven of these works are enjoying their world premier recordings on this disk.
The recorder performances are in the hands of Michala Petri and Elisabet Selin, and they are impressive exponents indeed. Ingrid Myrhoj appears on harpsichord for two pieces; Gert Mortensen plays the multiple percussion instrument part on the one work involved. Everyone sounds great but it is the expanded recorder techniques and the clarity, dynamic thrust and elan of their execution that bring it all together.
Alex Borup-Jorgensen (1924-2012) wrote these works between 1975 and 2011. That they were a labor of love seems clear as you listen. The mastering of the recorder parts by Michala Petri and Elisabet Selin were no doubt labors of love as well.
The earlier works feature rapid-fire jumps into and out of various registers; the later works less so. In any case the parts are difficult and superbly played. It's almost uncanny to hear the recorder in an expanded, ultra-modern tonality. Once one gets over the shock the idea that these are fine works that bear repeated hearings sets in. And from that point I was hooked.
This is not just state-of-the-art modern recorder music. It is also a collection of very pleasing high-modern chamber music.
Very much recommended.
Grego Applegate Edwards, February 3th 2014

Gapplegate

Michala Petri and Lars Hannibal
Virtuoso Baroque
Fantastic review on The Nightingale and Virtuoso Baroque in Sächische Zeitung!
Sächische Zeitung
03 February 2014
Sächische Zeitung ( Reichweite 710.000)

Grenzlos nah am Geschehen

Für die dänische Flötistin Michala Petri scheint nichts unmöglich. Jetz singt sie wie eine Nachtingall, und die klangtechnik brilliert dazu.

Wenn Michala Petri auftritt, dann lässt sie meist in irgendeiner Weise aufhoren. Da ist keine spur von Gewöhnung und Poutine – und dies, obwohl die Dänin ein Instrument spielt, bei dem mancher gähnend abwinkt: Blockflöte. Die scheinbar endlos wiederkehrenden Muster einer barocken Chaconne von Tomaso Antonio Vitali ermüden sie und auch den Hörer nicht. Viel zu ansteckend ist die Neugier, mit der sie die melodischen Variationen erobert. Seit 20 Jahren musiziert Michala Petri in Duo mit dem Lautenisten Lars Hannibal. Ihre Jubiläums – CD "Virtuoso Baroque" vereint Raritäten mit wohlbekanntem Sonatenwerk- Aber auch Bach, Händel und Telemann klingen hier so unverbraucht und rein, als seien die edlen Schätze gerade erst entdeckt worden.
"Ach Gott, wie ist das schön!", seufzte der Fischer, al ser vom Uferwald her jene Nachtingall singen hörte, die spatter den Kaiser von China zu Tränen rühren sollte. Der ausgefeilte Gesang der Nachtingall muss jeden faszinieren, der ihn hören kann. Keinen Ersatz, wohl aber neuen Anlass, vor Ergriffenheit zu seufzen, bietet Ugis Praulins, der Hans Christian Andersens Märchen aufgegriffen und in packend lautmalerischer Art für Flöte und Choir vertont hat. Der litausche Komponist ehrt darin die Nachtingall des Dänen mit ¨bersinnlichen Charakterzeichnungen und fordert dabei den Interpreten einiges ab. Keinerlei Mühe, vielmehr höchste Genugtung verspürt man bei Michala Petri und dem Danish National Vocal Ensemble unter Stewphen Layton. Sie haben "The Nightingale" und zudem drei weitere Werke erstmal eingespielt: "Nemesis divina" des Schweden Daniel Börtz, "I" vom Dänen Sunleif Rasmussen sowie "2 scenes with Skylark" des D¨nen Peter Bruun. Es sind faszinierende Schlaglichter nordischer Musik der letzen fünf Jahre. Singstemmen und Flöte finden dabei in unterschiedlichsten Klanglandschaften und Ausdruckbereichen organisch zusammen.
Die beiden SACDs bieten nicht nur künstlirischen Hochgenuss. Wann die heimische Wiedergabetechnich auf den Prüfstand dtellen, wenn nicht hier? Vor allem kann man fragen, auf welchem teller sich diese Tönträger zu drehen und welcher Wandler ihre Signale aus der digitalen zurück in die analoge Welt holen sollte, um das Optimum an Klangkvalität herauszuholen. Denn das hier verwendete DXD-Format (=Digital eXtreme Definition) bedeutet unvorstellbar viel Information: die achtfache Zahl an Signalabtastungen sowie 256-mal feiner aufgelöste Messwerte gegenüber der herkömmlichen CD. Zuhören lohnt sich. So nah eie an dem, was Michala Petri, Lars Hannibal und die singenden Dänen gezaubert haben, war Digital Audio nur selten am geschehen. "Virtuoso Baroque", "The Nightingale", Michala Petri, Lars Hannibal, Danish National Vocal Ensemble, Stephen Layton. (OUR Recordings).
Karsten Blüthgen 18.01.2012
Sächische Zeitung

Michala Petri and Lars Hannibal
Virtuoso Baroque
Great review of Virtuoso Baroque in Classical Guitar Magazine,- UK
Classical Guitar Magazine
03 February 2014
Classical Guitar Magazine, UK

It's somewhat immodest title, but long before Vitali's action-packed Chaconne has run its 9:54, course it becomes abundantly clear that Petri and Hannibal, whose two decades as a team this recording celebrates, are much to be immodest about. Having, by accident of birth, been raised in a neck of the woods where recorder-centred chamber gatherings featured the indefatigable John Turner are a frequent occurrence. I've been fully aware since preadolescence that there's much more to this instrument than battalions of seven-year-olds squeaking their way through Bobby Shaftoe.
But even so, I could hardly fail to be wowed by the sheer brilliance displayed by Michala Petri in the Vitali and elsewhere. And although Lars Hannibal's role is, by nature of his chosen instrument, that of accompanist, the range of textures emerging from a magnificent Paul Thomson archlute he proudly brandishes on the cover is extraordinary. For every routine series of block chord backdrops, there's a full-on active bass-line of the type Hannibal provides for the much of the central Allegro in The Devil's Trill.
Here and elsewhere, the duo treads a mostly familiar path, the greater part of the material being drawn from flute and fiddle sources. The notable exception is RV 59 which, according to Joshua Cheek's extensive programme notes, forms part of an elaborate hoax perpetrated by Nicolas Chédeville (1705-1782), whose agenda was to borrow the name of a big-hitting composer in order to give greater kudos to a series of sonatas he'd written for his own instrument, which was the musette. Given that the musette had by that time become little more than what Cheek terms "an exotic novelty", few would now blame Chédeville for doing what he allegedly did. And RV 59 is a wonderfully engaging baroque middleweight, whoever wrote it. Are there any musette recordings out there?
But until someone answers the above question, this classy and uplifting release from Petri and Hannibal ticks all the boxes.
Paul Fowles, April 2012
Classical Guitar Magazine

Michala Petri and Elisabet Selin
Axel Borup-Jørgensen (1924-2012)
Recorder music by Axel Borup-Jørgensen
Enthusiastic review on Recorder Music by Axel Borup-Jørgensen in The Classical Reviewer
The Classical Reviewer
02 February 2014
The Classical Reviewer Sunday, 19 January 2014
Works for recorder, harpsichord and percussion by Axel Borup-Jørgensen on an attractive release from OUR Recordings
Axel Borup-Jørgensen (1924-2012) www.borup-jorgensen.dk was born in Denmark but grew up in Sweden. He studied piano at the Royal Danish Academy of Music and orchestration with Poul Schierbeck and Jorgen Jersild. He was one of the first Danish composers to attend Darmstadt school, but he has never composed serial music.
Axel Borup-Jørgensen's music is characterized by his Swedish upbringing, and among his works feature Swedish poetry and the Swedish landscape. His large output of compositions includes music for orchestra, chamber music, songs with piano and other instruments. Prominent amongst his works are compositions for percussion and guitar. Axel Borup-Jørgensen was a seminal figure in contemporary Danish musical life and the recipient of a number of the country's most distinguished awards, including the Carl Nielsen Prize and the Wilhelm Hansen Prize. 

He considered himself a self-taught composer; while being thoroughly 'modern' in outlook; his music is organic, expressionist, always embracing the sheer sensual beauty of the musical tone.

A new release from OUR Recordings www.ourrecordings.com presents Borup-Jørgensen's complete works for recorder; a chronicle of a thirty year relationship that began when his daughter, Elisabet Selin became Michala Petri's first and only private student. This recording is unique in that the artists featured, Michala Petri www.michalapetri.com  and Elisabet  Selin (recorders), Ingrid Myrhoj (harpsichord) and Gert Mortensen (percussion) www.gertmortensen.com are those for whom these works were originally composed, their interpretations, therefore being both personal and authoritative.

Drum rolls open Periphrasis, Op.156 (1977, rev. 1993-94) for recorder and percussion behind which the low sound of a recorder hovers. Other percussion adds to the texture before the recorder plays a staccato theme that jumps around, high in the register. As the recorder dances around the percussion, various textures and colours are created. Despite the outwardly fragmented sounds, the recorder maintains an underlying melodic line that is most attractive. Later the music slows in a delicate passage with quiet thoughtful phrases leading to a hushed end. Overall this is a real musical achievement, wonderfully played by for Michala Petri and Gert Mortensen.

Nachtstuck, Op. 118:1 (1987) for tenor recorder opens with what sounds like light drum taps but which are actually recorder sounds made by an unusual technique. The recorder tentatively introduces a theme, quiet and mournful, with little upward phrases and more, odd breathing effects from the recorder that sound like snare drum.  More textures are drawn from the recorder in this challenging example of recorder technique brilliantly realised by Elisabet Selin. Louder phrases appear, darting around before strange dissonant multitones conjure up a nightmarish nocturnal atmosphere as the music slowly find its way to a quiet coda.

Architraves, Op.83 (1977) for sopranino recorder solo brings a joyful motif that dances around. Axel Borup-Jørgensen has a way of creating a kind of lyricism from seemingly abstract, even fragmented ideas. Michala Petri is terrific here, with fine precision in the sharp staccato notes that often seem to imitate bird sounds. A terrific work.

There is a vibrant opening for recorder and harpsichord in Zwiegespräch, Op. 131 (1988-89) for sopranino recorder and harpsichord with Borup-Jørgensen again drawing a lyrical line from fragmented motifs and varied intervals. It is strange how well these instruments sound together, taking our perception of them as baroque instruments and creating a modern language for them. Both have a kind of dialogue, the harpsichord with short, clipped phrases and the recorder more melodic and flowing. There is much fine playing from Elisabet Selin and Ingrid Myrhøj.

Bird song again appears in Birds Concert, Op.91:9 (1995) for descant recorder solo, but it is longer drawn phrases that open the work, before little bird like motifs appear. The longer phrases return but are slowly overtaken by the bird trills in this wonderfully effective piece so well played by Michala Petri, for whom it was written.

Elisabet Selin and Ingrid Myrhøj return for the Fantasia, Op.75 (1975, rev. 1986-88) for sopranino recorder and harpsichord. The sopranino recorder maintains a melodic line over the fragmented chords of the harpsichord and, as the work progresses, the harpsichord develops intricate, ever changing sounds whilst the recorder continues its melodic flow with some wonderfully fluent playing from Selin. Towards the end, the recorder holds an incredibly long note against the harpsichord before weaving its way to the coda.

The mellow sound of the treble recorder comes as a contrast in Pergolato, Op.183 (2011) for treble recorder solo with Michala Petri playing a mellifluous melody. There are no unusual recorder techniques here, the recorder really sings in Petri's hands. Repeated melodic phrases do not outstay their welcome as the music flows to its gentle coda.

Birdsong again seems to immerse itself into Notenbüchlein, Op.82 (1977-79) for descant recorder solo. It is hard not to become immersed oneself in this attractive music where Borup-Jørgensen's playful little bird trills are so lovely. A beautifully written piece, exquisitely played by Elisabet Selin.

This attractive and worthwhile release is an excellent memorial to Axel Borup-Jørgensen and his exploration of the recorder. Well recorded on various dates and at various venues, there are informative booklet notes by the composer and Jens Brincker.

The Classical Reviewer
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2200 Copenhagen N
Denmark
Tel: +45 4015 05 77
E-mail: hannibal@michalapetri.com
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